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1 ABBOT, Willis J. Panama And the Canal In Picture and Prose
Syndicate Publishing Company, 1914, 
ABBOT, Willis J. Panama and the Canal In Picture and Prose : A complete story of Panama, as well as the history, purpose and promise of its world-famous canal - the most gigantic engineering undertaking since the dawn of time. Approved by leading officials connected with the great enterprise. Water-colors by E.J. Read and Gordon Grant. Profusely illustrated by over 600 unique and attractive photographs taken expressly fot this book by our special staff. N.Y.: Syndicate Publishing Company, 1914. Pp 414. 4to, red cloth. First appeared the previous year. Rear inner hinge repaired with cloth tape, else vg. 80.00

Price: 80.00 CDN
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2 AGUIRRE, Robert W. International Straits of the World, Vol.15 Panama Canal.. Volume 15 in the International Straits of the World series. First Edition
Martinus Nijhoff, Leiden / Boston, 2010, ISBN:9004177280 
AGUIRRE, Robert W. The Panama Canal. Leiden / Boston : Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2010. First Edition. Pp. (4),[v]-xii,(2),[1]-293,(5). Maps, tables, illustrations in text. 8vo, green paper-covered boards, light green lettering to front & spine. Volume 15 in the International Straits of the World series. "The relationship between straits and interoceanic canals has always been ambiguous. Unlike straits, interoceanic canals are neither natural nor subject to a universal legal regime like the Law of the Sea. However, straits and interoceanic canals share comparable historical experiences due to their geographic similarities. Suspending interest in a purely legal analysis, The Panama Canal lets logic yield to experience and considers the Panama Canal as an 'artificial strait'. The volume recasts the dynamic events that have changed the Panama Canal in the context of three interactive elements: environments, flows, and territoriality. Cleverly deciphering from history how changes in one element led to changes in another, The Panama Canal suggests a considerably new perspective for viewing the canal's past and future." - from rear cover. Contents : 1. Introduction. A. Straits in Comparative Perspective. B. The Three Circumstances of a Strait: Environments, Flows, and Territoriality. C. Conclusion. 2. Part One - The Environment of aStrait. A. Introduction. B. How a Strait Became an Isthmus 16 Million Year s Ago. C. How an Isthmus Became an Artificial Strait One Hundred Years Ago.D. Why an Artificial Strait Will Reach Maximum Sustainable Capacity Betwee n 2009 and 2012 Unless Enhanced. E. Conclusion. Part Two - Flows Through the Environment. 3. Interoceanic Flows in Transit Through Panama's Human-Built Environment. A. Introduction. B. The Royal Road and Cruces Trail 1540–1740. C. The Panama Railroad 1852–1869. D. The Panama Canal 1914–date. E. Conclusion. Part Three - Territoriality Over Flows Through the Environment. 4. Panamanian Territoriality in Geographic Perspective. A. Maritime-Commercialand Territorial-Administrative Societies. B. The Two Panamas Under the Vic eroyalty of Peru Until 1717. C. The Two Panamas Under the Viceroyalty of New Granada Until Panamanian Independence in 1821. D. The Two Panamas Under Great Colombia (1819–1831). E. Conclusion. 5. American Territoriality in Geographic Perspective. A. Territorial Enlargement, Political Regimes, and Interoceanic Transportation. B. Territoriality and Territorial Enlargement. C.Conclusion. 6. The Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government. A. I ntroduction. B. Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over Transportation During the ‘1st republic’ (1780s–1820s). C. Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over Transportation During the ‘1st democracy’ (1830s–1870s). D. Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over Other Buffer Zones. E. The 1888 Supreme Court Decision in California v. Central Pacific Railroad Company. F. Conclusion. 7. Interoceanic Transportation and the Two Panamas Under the '1st democracy' (1830s-1870s). A. American Territoriality Over Interoceanic Transportation During the ‘1st democracy’ (1830s–1870s). B. The Two Panamas Under the Centralized Republic of New Granada (1831–1858). C. The Two Panamas Under the Federalist Grenadine Confederation (1858–1863) and United States of Colombia (1863–1886). D. Conclusion. 8. Interoceanic Transportation and the Two Panamas Under the '2nd republic' ,(1870s-1930s) Before Panamanian Independence. A. American Territoriality OverInteroceanic Transportation. B. The Two Panamas Under the Republic ofColombia (1886–1903). C. The Two Panamas Under the Republic of Panama. D. Conclusion. 9. The Extraterritorial Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over the Maritime Environment after the 1880s. A. Introduction. B. The Extraterritorial Expansion of the Powers of theFederal Government Over Islands, Straits, and Sea LanesDuring the ‘2nd republic’ (1870s–1930s). C. Conclusion. 10. The Panama Canal and The Two Panamas Under the '2nd republic' (1870s-1930s) After Panammanan Independence. A. American Extraterritoriality through the 1903Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty. B. The Panama Canal and Canal Zone. C. The Two Panamas During an Era of Political Opposition Among the Elite 1900s to 1930s. D. Conclusion. 11. The Panama Canal and The Two Panamas Under the '2nd democracy' (1930s-1970s). A. American Territoriality Over InteroceanicTransportation Under the ‘2nd democracy’ (1930s–1970s). B. The Two Panamas During an Era of Social Rivalry between Non-Elite and Elitefrom the 1930s to the 1960s. C. The Two Panamas Under the National Guard U ntil 1981. D. American Territoriality and the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties. E. Conclusion. 12. The Panama Canal and The Two Panamas Under the '3rd republic' (1980-?). A. American Territoriality Over InteroceanicTransportation During the ‘3rd republic’ (1980–?). B. The Two Panamas Under the Panamanian Defense Forces Until 1989. C. The Two Panamas after the Abolishment of the Panamanian Defense Forces. D. Conclusion. 13. The Future nof the Panama Canal as an Artificial Strait. A. Changes in Panama’s Environment and Competition from Other Routes. B. Panamanian Societies and American Policy Regimes.C. Conclusion. Appendix. Very good. 170.00

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3 Allied Countries - WW2). Canada and the United Nations. A Tribute to the United Nations by Guita Percha & Rubber, Limited
Guita Percha & Rubber, Limited, 1943, 
(Allied Countries - WW2). Canada and the United Nations. A Tribute to the United Nations by Guita Percha & Rubber, Limited. N.pl.: (Guita Percha & Rubber, Limited , 1943). Pp 1-20. Illustrated. 8vo, blue stapled card covers. “Guita Percha & Rubber, Limited, an all-Canadian Company, is happy to pres ent this booklet to our customers and friends as a tribute to the United Nations.” - from page one. This booklet has information on the allied countries participating in World War Two, including a brief summary of each country along with a picture of its flag and leader(s). The countries covered are Great Britain, Canada, South Africa, India, Australia, New Zealand, United States, U.S.S.R., China, Netherlands, Norway, Czechoslovakia, Poland, Greece, Yugoslavia, France, Belgium, Mexico, Brazil, Iraq, Luxembourg, Denmark, Ethiopia, Philippines, Panama, Cuba, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, El Salvador, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Costa Rica, Bolivia, and Iran. Spine and edges worn, tears along half of spine, penned names, else good. 15.00

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4 ALPHONSE, Ephraim S. Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 162 Guaymi Grammar and Dictionary with some ethnological notes
United States Government Printing Office, Washington, D.C., 1956, 
ALPHONSE, Ephraim S. Guaymi Grammar and Dictionary with some ethnological notes. Smithsonian Institution, Bureau of American Ethnology, Bulletin 162. Washington, D.C.: United States Government Printing Office, 1956. Pp (2),iii-ix,(1),1-128,(2). 8vo, grey card covers, lettered in black. Guaymí, or Ngäbere, also known as Movere, Chiriquí, and Valiente, is spoken by the indigenous Ngäbe people in Panama and Costa Rica. Contents : Basic elements; General rules; Nouns; Pronouns; Adjectives; Articles; Comparison of adjectives; Adverbs; Prepositions; Conjunction; Verbs; Etymology or the history of words; Rules for the arrangement of words, or syntax; Peculiar Guaymi phrasesand miscellaneous; Series of "Don'ts"; Passive voice;Method of commanding; Figures of speech; Models of Guaymf texts; Models of phrase; Vocabulary (p p 62-117); Appendix. Customs of the Guaymi. Spine and marginssunned, top offront cover clipped, else very good. 15.00

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5 AUGERON, Mickael DUPLESSIS, Robert Fleuves, rivieres et colonies : La France et ses empires (XVIIe-XXe siecle)/ Waterways and colonies : France and its empires (17th-20th centuries). p aperback
Les Indes savantes, Paris, 2010, ISBN:9782846542524 
AUGERON, Mickael, and Robert DUPLESSIS, (eds.). Fleuves, rivières et colonies : La France et ses empires (XVIIe-XXe siecle) / Waterways and colonies :France and its empires (17th-20th centuries). (Paris) : Les Indes savantes , (2010). Pp (8),9-[379],(5). Maps. 8vo, illustrated grey card covers, lettered in white and black. Actes du 33e congrès international de la French Colonial Historical Society qui s'est tenu à La Rochelle et à Brouage, France, du 6 au 10 juin 2007 / Papers presented at the 33rd annual Meeting of theFrench Colonial Historical Society, La Rochelle and Brouage, France, June 6-10, 2007. Contents : Rivers and colonies : historiographic balance sheet and research perspectives (by Mickael Augeron and Robert DuPlessis). Partie1 : Autorités coloniales et enjeux géostratégiques / Colonial authorities and their strategic stakes. 1. Morissonneau, Christian : Une position importante de la trajectoire française dans le Saint-Laurent : le cap de Victoire (fin XVIe siècle - années 1630). Relations franco-amérindiennes, commerceet géopolitique (par Christian Morissonneau). 2. Rivières et lagon de Mayo tte : un défi permanent pour les autorités coloniales (par Isabelle Denis).3. L'enlèvement de l'enseigne de vaisseau Lebrun (3 mai 1854 - 8 juillet 1 854). Uneréaction africaine face au projet français de fortification de l'escale fluviale de Podor (moyenne vallée du Sénégal) (par Mamadou Sy). 4. L'histoire de la Casamance à travers celle des Rivières du Sud (par Bertrand Bassène Pape Chérif). 5. Entre la croix et le galon , les chefs indigènes kanak au coeur de la concurrence entre autorités religieuses et coloniales (Nouvelle-Calédonie, 1878-1917) (par Anne-Laure Jaumouillé). 6. Panama 1885 : révolution et lutte d'influence franco-états-unienne (par Romain Delmon).Partie 2 : Construction des savoirs géographiques et maîtrise de l'espace / Constructing geographic knowledge and mastering space. 7. "Fautoe de mieux" Explaining the belated beginnings of New Orleans as the predominant townof eighteenth-century Greater French colonial Louisiana (by Joseph Zitomer sky). 8. La pénétration française des régions du Haut-Niger : la mission Gallieni (30 janvier 1880 - 12 mai 1881) (par Pierre Guillaume). 9. La Révolution haïtienne vue par deux personnages contemporains : le scientifique prussien Alexander von Humboldt et l'homme d'État américain Thomas Jefferson (par Sandra Rebok). 10. Concept, représentations et symbolique des réseaux de transports dans la Tunisie coloniale (par Serge La Barbera). 11. Fleuves et colonies d'Amérique d'après les géographes français, au tournant des XIXe et XXe siècles (par Guy Martinière). 12. "Une géographie impure et combien séculière" : Pierre Gourou, la tropicalité et le delta tonkinois (par Gavin Bowd). Partie 3 : Des prouits au fil de l'eau / Exchanging goods along the waterways. 13. Le commerce rochelais vers les Antilles durant la guerre de la Ligue d'Augsbourg (1688-1698) (par Philippe Hrodej). 14. Au fil des eaux de la Sèvre niortaise : Marans et le pays marandais, une interface avecles colonies d'Amérique au XVIIIe siècle (par Laurent Marien). 15. La Char ente au long-cours : croissance, crise et reprise du grand commerce rochefortais (1760-1830) (par Thierry Sauzeau). 16. Rochefort et les Amérindiens :un arsenal impliqué dans les réseaux écoomiques et diplomatiques français (1666-1790) (par Jihane Kaouk). 17. Suffering for Jesus : Penitential Practices at Fort St. Joseph (Niles, Michigan) During the French Regime (by JoséAntonio Brandao and Michael Shakir Nassaney). 18. Defining a French Atlant ic Empire : some material culture evidence (by Robert S. DuPlessis). . Partie 4 : Habiter les colonies : les voies de l'intégration et de l'acculturation / Living in the colonies : integration and acculturation. 19. Des truchements aux spécialistes : l'inscription de la langue tupi dans les ouvragesfrançais des XVIe et XVIIe siècles (par Andrea Daher). 20. Colons des pays de l'Adour (Gascons, Basques et Béarnais) à Saint-Domingue (XVIIe-XVIIIe s iècles) (par Jacques de Cauna). 21. Rochefort : un arsenal pourvoyeur de main-d'oeuvre pour les colonies françaises. Origines des engagés partis vers les Amériques entre 1705 et 1758 (par Mélanie Thomas). 22. Rivers of Republic, Rivers of Empire : The Transformation of a Young Soldier, 1892-1893 (byMarie Bolton and Nancy C. Unger). 23. La vallée du Saint-Laurent au XVIIIe siècle : la place de la ville dans l'itinéraire de l'immigrant (par Samant ha Rompillon). 24. Les caprices d'un fleuve (1996, Bernard Giraudeau). Pérennité et reformulation de l'imaginaire colonial (par Floréal Jiménez). Mostarticles in French, a few in English. Very good. 75.00

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6 BARKER, Roland Tusitala : The story of a remarkable voyasge in the last of America's Square-rigged ships. First American Edition in dustjacket.
Norton, New York, 1959, 
BARKER, Roland. Tusitala : The Story of a Voyage in the Last of America's Square Riggers. N.Y.: W.W. Norton & Co., (1959). First Edition. Pp. (6),[7]-192, + 8 p. of black and white plates. Illustrated. 8vo, blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine. "A seagoing book of the first order is this personalrecord of the remarkable voyage in 1928 of the last of America's square-ri gged ships. Roland Barker, aged 22, signs on as third mate; the moment he steps aboard he becomes the impersonal 'mister,' subject to the traditional iron discipline of a stern captain, James P. narler. This is a tough assignment, for Captain Barker is Roland's own father. During the whole eight months' voyage from New York to Hawaii and back by way of Seattle and the Panama Canal, this fact never is allowed to enter into the relationship betweenthird mate and captain, but it creates its tensions for the son with other members of the crew. The description of the voyage, of the sailors and the ports of call, but particularly the intimate account of life aboard a grea t seagoing sailing vessel, evokes a wonderful way of life that has gone forever." - from the dustjacket. Light foxing, faint spotting to edges, name inked to flyleaf, light sunning to top edge, else good in dampwrinkled, nicked dustjacket. 15.00

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7 BARRETT, John Panama Canal : What It Is, What It Means
Pan American Union, 1913, 
BARRETT, John. Panama Canal : What It Is, What It Means. Washington, D.C.: Pan American Union, 1913. Pp 120, with frontis and maps, and 1 fldg map at rear. 8vo, tan cloth. Rubbed at corners, small tear to front, slight staining, else vg. 27.00

Price: 27.00 CDN
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8 BEATTY, Charles DE LESSEPS, Ferdinand De Lesseps of Suez : The Man and His Times. First American Edition in dustjacket
Harper, New York, 1956, 
BEATTY, Charles. De Lesseps of Suez : The Man and His Times. New York : Harper & Brothers, (1956). Pp 334. Illustrated. 8vo, black cloth spine, brown cloth boards. This is the US edition of the book published in England underthe title Ferdinand de Lesseps : A Biographical study. De Lesseps was the man who made the Suez Canal and inaugurated the Panama Canal project. Very good in dustjacket. 25.00

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9 BOCZEK, Boleslaw Adam McDOUGAL, Myres S., foreword Flags of Convenience : An International Legal Study
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1962, 
BOCZEK, Boleslaw Adam. Flags of Convenience : An International Legal Study.Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1962. Pp (6),[v]-xvi,(2),[1]-3 23,(1). 8vo, black cloth, gilt lettering to spine. Papadakis, InternationalLaw of the Sea: A Bibliography 1471; McConville and Rickaby, Shipping Busi ness and Maritime Economics: An Annotated International Bibliography 2798. Foreword by Myres S. McDougal. "This book presents.the first comprehensive discussion of the problem of flags of convenience - the flags of Panama, Liberia, Honduras (Panlibhon), as well as others under which many foreign andAmerican-owned ships are registered. The issue is of particular interest f or the United States because of its effects on labor unions and defense planning. Before embarking on his major subject, the international legal aspects of foreign registry, Mr. Boczek outlines the origin and growth of the practice, giving the present size and composition of the various fleets. He gives the reasons why ship owners have been deserting their national flags and why they have preferred to register under a particular Panlibhon flag. For American owners the principal answer in the first case is to reduce operating costs, and in the second to escape taxation. For international law the basic issue is whether the nationality granted to ships by the Panlibhon states should be recognized by other states and be conclusive for all purposes of international law. After an analysis of this problem, the author treats, among other issues, the matterof labor jurisdiction on Panlibhon ships, the relevant advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice of 1960, the concept of 'effective U.S. control,' and the notion of 'genuine link,' as it was introduced in the International Law Commission and formulatedat the 1958 Geneva Conference on the Law of the Sea in the still unratifie d Convention on the High Seas. In a concluding chapter, the author suggeststhat the solution to this highly controversial issue in international ship ping should be sought on the economic and fiscal levels of the states concerned." - from the dj. Chapters : 1. Introduction; 2. The Flight from National Flags; 3. The Opposition to Flags of Convenience; 4. The Basic Issue forInternational Law; 5. The IMCO Dispute: The Case before the World Court; 6 . The Problem of Labor Jurisdiction; 7. The Doctrine of "Effective United States Control"; 8. The Attack on the Traditional Principle before 1958; 9. The 1958 Geneva Conference on the Law of the Sea; 10. Summary and Conclusions. With bibliography, table of cases cited, and index. Ex library with usual stamps, pouches, &c else clean and solid in dustjacket. 100.00

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10 BOCZEK, Boleslaw Adam McDOUGAL, Myres S., foreword Flags of Convenience : An International Legal Study
Harvard University Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1962, 
BOCZEK, Boleslaw Adam. Flags of Convenience : An International Legal Study.Cambridge, Mass.: Harvard University Press, 1962. Pp (6),[v]-xvi,(2),[1]-3 23,(1). 8vo, black cloth, gilt lettering to spine. Papadakis, InternationalLaw of the Sea: A Bibliography 1471; McConville and Rickaby, Shipping Busi ness and Maritime Economics: An Annotated International Bibliography 2798. Foreword by Myres S. McDougal. "This book presents.the first comprehensive discussion of the problem of flags of convenience - the flags of Panama, Liberia, Honduras (Panlibhon), as well as others under which many foreign andAmerican-owned ships are registered. The issue is of particular interest f or the United States because of its effects on labor unions and defense planning. Before embarking on his major subject, the international legal aspects of foreign registry, Mr. Boczek outlines the origin and growth of the practice, giving the present size and composition of the various fleets. He gives the reasons why ship owners have been deserting their national flags and why they have preferred to register under a particular Panlibhon flag. For American owners the principal answer in the first case is to reduce operating costs, and in the second to escape taxation. For international law the basic issue is whether the nationality granted to ships by the Panlibhon states should be recognized by other states and be conclusive for all purposes of international law. After an analysis of this problem, the author treats, among other issues, the matterof labor jurisdiction on Panlibhon ships, the relevant advisory opinion of the International Court of Justice of 1960, the concept of 'effective U.S. control,' and the notion of 'genuine link,' as it was introduced in the International Law Commission and formulatedat the 1958 Geneva Conference on the Law of the Sea in the still unratifie d Convention on the High Seas. In a concluding chapter, the author suggeststhat the solution to this highly controversial issue in international ship ping should be sought on the economic and fiscal levels of the states concerned." - from the dj [not with this copy]. Chapters : 1. Introduction; 2. The Flight from National Flags; 3. The Opposition to Flags of Convenience; 4. The Basic Issue for International Law; 5. The IMCO Dispute: The Case before the World Court; 6. The Problem of Labor Jurisdiction; 7. The Doctrine of "Effective United States Control"; 8. The Attack on the Traditional Principle before 1958; 9. The 1958 Geneva Conference on the Law of the Sea; 10. Summary and Conclusions. With bibliography, table of cases cited, and index. Ex library with usual stamps, pouches, &c, spine sunned, light wear to cloth, else very good. 85.00

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11 BOYCE, Rubert W. Mosquito or Man? The Conquest of the Tropical World. First Edition
John Murray, London, 1909, 
BOYCE, Rubert W., Sir. Mosquito or Man? The Conquest of the Tropical World.With illustrations. London : John Murray, 1909. First Edition. Pp (6),vii- xvi,1-267,(1), frontispiece + 43 plates. Index. 8vo, green cloth, gilt lettering to front board and spine, top edge gilt. Contents : Part I. 1. Foundation of the Tropical Medicine Movement in England. 2. Growth of General andApplied Sanitation in the Tropics. 3. Miasm, Tradition, and Prejudice. 4. The Forerunners of the Discoveries of the Mosquito Origin of Diseases. 5. Filaria and the Mosquito : Manson's Discovery. 6. The Discovery of the Parasite of Malaria in the blood of man by Laveran, and of its further development and passage through the mosquito by Ross. 7. The Plan of Campaign against the Mosquito. 8. Summary of the Antimalarial Campaigns. 9. Notes on the relationship of Plantations and Botanic Gardens to the Mosquito Question. 10. Yellow Fever—Dr. Beauperthuy on Tradition in Medicine and his view of theMode of Transmission of Yellow Fever. Harrison and Moxley on the nature of the virus of Yellow Fever. 11. Historical Survey of Yellow Fever: Its dest ructive Spread and Mortality during the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries. 12. Discovery of the Mode of Transmission of Yellow Fever and Plan of Campaign against the Mosquito. 13. The Breeding Places of Stegomyia. Stegomyia Survey and Index. 14. The Yellow Fever Campaigns in Havana, Cuba, New Orleans, Honduras, Rio Janeiuo, Santos, Panama Canal Zone, the West Indies, the Amazon. Part II. 15. Sleeping Sickness; Flies and Disease. 16. Ankylostomiasis: Dirt Contamination. 17. Malta Fever and Goats' Milk. 18. The Rise and Fall of Disease, Plague, Tick Fever, Leprosy and Tuberculosis. Appendix :(1) Ordinances, Regulations, and Bye-laws relating ng to Stagnant Water, M osquito Larvae, Yellow Fever, Rats, etc. (2) Tropical Expeditions and Commissions of the Royal Society, the Colonial Office, and the Schools of Tropical Medicine of London and Liverpool. Spine browned and worn, front hinge shaky, penned gift inscription, else very good. 50.00

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12 CAMERON, James M. Yesteryears in Pictou County. 1st pr
Pictou County Historical Society, 1994, 
CAMERON, James Malcolm. Yesteryears in Pictou County. N.pl.: (The Pictou County Historical Society, [December] 1994). Pp (8),9-210,(2). 8vo, decoratedcream card covers. Of nautical interest: Local Ship Torpedoed (on the loss of the Pontiac, pp. 14-18); Pictonian Solved a Panama Canal Problem (pp. 5 3-56); The Trenton Shipyard (pp. 70-74); The August Gale (1873 hurricane, with info on the damage and/or loss of the schooners Acadia, Aid, Brother, Bertha Allen, Bonny Bell, E.R. Russell, Napier, Agile, Amos Cutter, Dusky Lake, Enoch Brenner, M.C. McLean, Electric, Ferguson, Bloomer, Little Hugh, Emmanuel, Leo MacDonald, Ventura, Ocean Wave, Gordon, and Thompson; the barques James Duncan, Nordsjernen, and Commissioner; the brigs E.C. Mutch, Millie, Messina, and Zanoi; the brigantine Willow Brae; the ferry boat East Riding; as well as the Brilliant Star, David Henry, Robert Bruce, Guiding Star, and Norma; pp. 75-79); Pictou, the Gateway Port (pp. 91-96); and Life Saving at Sea (pp. 158-162). Other contents: Some of the Worst Fires; Ernie Williams, All-Around Athlete; The Consulate at Pictou; Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper; Fire in the Aberdeen Hospital; Pictonians in the Heavy Artillery; Church Disagreements; The Pre-Confederation Gunners; The Sheriffs Harris; Railroad Fatalities; Father William b. MacDonald; The Headless Body Mystery; The Piper in Bronze; Royalty in Stellarton; The Guysborough Railroad; Fred J.Gormley, Scientist-Lawyer; Dashed Hopes; Textile Mill Fires; Dr George Hil l, War Ace; The Dryden Murder; First World War Aviators; The Pre-Confederation Militia; Distinguished Visitors; Rogers' Circus; Bobby Dummond, Labour Leader; Early Automobiles; Old Times in Stellarton; Untimely Deaths; Auto Bandits in West Pictou; Former Industries; Angus Cameron, Scholar; Round theWorld Flies; and Trouble in the West. Vg. 15.00

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13 CAMERON, James M. Yesteryears in Pictou County. Second Printing, paperback.
Pictou County Historical Society, 1995, 
CAMERON, James Malcolm. Yesteryears in Pictou County. N.pl.: (The Pictou County Historical Society, 1995). Second Printing. Pp (8),9-210,(2). 8vo, cream card covers with green lettering to front cover and spine. Of nautical interest: Local Ship Torpedoed (on the loss of the Pontiac, pp. 14-18); Pictonian Solved a Panama Canal Problem (pp. 53-56); The Trenton Shipyard (pp. 70-74); The August Gale (1873 hurricane, with info on the damage and/or loss of the schooners Acadia, Aid, Brother, Bertha Allen, Bonny Bell, E.R. Russell, Napier, Agile, Amos Cutter, Dusky Lake, Enoch Brenner, M.C. McLean, Electric, Ferguson, Bloomer, Little Hugh, Emmanuel, Leo MacDonald, Ventura, Ocean Wave, Gordon, and Thompson; the barques James Duncan, Nordsjernen, and Commissioner; the brigs E.C. Mutch, Millie, Messina, and Zanoi; the brigantine Willow Brae; the ferry boat East Riding; as well as the Brilliant Star, David Henry, Robert Bruce, Guiding Star, and Norma; pp. 75-79); Pictou, the Gateway Port (pp. 91-96); and Life Saving at Sea (pp. 158-162). Other contents: Some of the Worst Fires; Ernie Williams, All-Around Athlete; The Consulate at Pictou; Sir Charles Hibbert Tupper; Fire in the Aberdeen Hospital; Pictonians in the Heavy Artillery; Church Disagreements; The Pre-Confederation Gunners; The Sheriffs Harris; Railroad Fatalities; Father William b. MacDonald; The Headless Body Mystery; The Piper in Bronze; Royalty in Stellarton; The Guysborough Railroad; Fred J. Gormley, Scientist-Lawyer; Dashed Hopes; Textile Mill Fires; Dr George Hill, War Ace; The Dryden Murder; First World War Aviators; The Pre-Confederation Militia; Distinguished Visitors; Rogers' Circus; Bobby Dummond, Labour Leader; Early Automobiles; Old Times in Stellarton; Untimely Deaths; Auto Bandits in West Pictou; Former Industries; Angus Cameron, Scholar; Round the World Flies; and Trouble in the West. Very good. Due to its small size, shipping costs should be a bit cheaper than quoted. 12.50

Price: 12.50 CDN
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14 CANALS) Soo Locks Boat Tours 1989 Vol 1) Locks & Ships. card covers
Soo Locks Boat Tours, 1989, 
(Canals). Locks & Ships. Sault Ste. Marie, Mich.: Soo Locks Boat Tours, 1989. [Cover adds... Special Feature Articles: The Soo Locks; The St. LawrenceSeaway; The Panama Canal; Ships Listing; Soo History; Charts & Nautical Te rms]. Pp 96. Illustrated with b/w and/or colour photos and drawings to text. 8vo, illustrated card covers. Soo Locks Boat Tours 1989. Volume One November Shipwreck Edition. "This book was designed to answer the most frequently asked questions that our crews have received over the years. [...] This first volume has a special section on the major November shipwrecks." -from the text. Ships referred to as shipwrecked or lost in this section are: Thesteamer Bannockburn; Ira H. Owen; George Herbert; Cresent City; Turrent Ch ief; Henry B. Smith; H. E. Runnels; Tioga; Myron; Novadoc; William B. Davock; Anna C. Minch; Carl D. Bradley; Daniel J. Morrell; and the Edmund Fitzgerald. Covers rubbed, price sticker remainder to front cover, ow vg. 15.00

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South America Social, Indutrial, and Political : A Twenty-Five-Thousand-Mile Journey in Search of Information in the Isthmus of Panama and the Lands of the Equator, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Tierra del Fuego, the Falklands, Argentia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, the Guianas, Venezuela, and the Orinoco Basin., CARPENTER, Frank G.
15 CARPENTER, Frank G. South America Social, Indutrial, and Political : A Twenty-Five-Thousand-Mile Journey in Search of Information in the Isthmus of Panama and the Lands of the Equator, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Tierra del Fuego, the Falklands, Argentia, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, the Guianas, Venezuela, and the Orinoco Basin.
Saalfield, 1903, 1903 
CARPENTER, Frank G. South America Social, Industrial, and Political : A Twenty-Five-Thousand-Mile Journey in Search of Information in the Isthmus of Panama and the Lands of the Equator, Columbia, Ecuador, Peru, Bolivia, Chile, Tierra del Fuego, the Falklands, Argentina, Paraguay, Uruguay, Brazil, the Guianas, Venezuela, and the Orinoco Basin. The Resources and Possibilities of the Various Countries - the Life and Customs of the People - Their Governments, Business Methods, and Trade. Fully Illustrated. Akron : Saalfield Publishing Company, 1903. Pp 625. Large 8vo, navy cloth, gilt lettering.

Contents:
1. From New York to Panama: A Winter Sail over the Caribbean Sea on an American Steamer — A New Use for the Gulf Stream — Landing at Colon — Its Hospitals and its Cemeteries — A Graveyard of Foreigners — The Terrors of the Isthmus;

2. Across the Isthmus by Railroad: The Story of the Panama Railroad, which has made Fortunes for its Owners — It Charges the Highest Fares and Pays Dividends of Millions — The Scenery of the Isthmus — The Chagres River — A Look at the City of Panama — Its Odd Social Customs — Its Lottery and its Bull-Ring;

3. The Panama Canal: A Description of this Colossal Work, which has Cost a Quarter of a Billion Dollars and is not Half Done — A Walk along the Canal — Three Thousand Labourers and What They Are Doing — The Canal Scandals, and how De Lesseps and his Associates stole Millions — Fortunes in Machinery now going to Waste — Will the Canal be Completed ? ;

4. The Wonders of Colombia : An Undeveloped Empire still unexplored — A Look at the Cauca Valley, where Americans are now Settling — A River of Vinegar — Bogota, the Capital — What Colombia produces — It is a Land of Gold — Queer Features of Travel on the Southern Pacific — How one feels on the Equator;

5. The Land of the Equator: The Wonders of Ecuador — Trees that weave Blankets, and Mules that wear Pantalets — The Curious City of Guayaquil — Its Police and Fire Department — Where the Taxes are Low and the Death-Rate is High — Ecuador’s Debt Slaves, and how they are Oppressed;

6. The Bangkok of Ecuador : A Ride up the Guayas River to the Foot of the Andes — The Floating Town of Babahoyo, whose People live upon the Water — A Visit to the Cacao Plantations, whence our Chocolate comes — Ecuadorian Farming, and its enormous Profits — Wages and the Cost of Living;

7. The Mountains of the Equator: The Highlands of the Northern Andes — Chimborazo and Cotopaxi — Quito, the highest Capital City in the World — Civilization in Ecuador — The different classes of the People — How the Whites rule — The Aborigines — Savage Indians who bake the Heads of their Enemies;

8. On the Great South American Desert. A Land of Dry Sand, where it Rains only once in Seven Years — Skeletons and Mummies — Travelling Sand-Dunes, which are always on the March — Among the Ruins of the Incas — The old City of Jequetepec — Cajamarca, and Atahualpa’s Prison Cell, which he filled with Gold — The Sunsets of the Desert;

9. The Irrigated Valleys of Peru. A Land where Cotton grows on Trees and is Red in Colour — The big Sugar Plantations, and how the}'- are Managed — Peruvian Labour and Wages — A Look at the Peons and their Homes;

10. An Hour with the President of Peru. The Romantic career of a South American statesman — How he fought his way through Revolution to Power — His Narrow Escape in a woman's clothes — The Resources of Peru — One of the Richest Countries in the World, with the poorest Inhabitants — Peru’s War with Chile, and how her Treasure was Stolen;

11. The Capital of Peru. A Magnificent City made of Mud and Fishing-Poles — How Lima Houses are Built — Chickens that live on the Housetops — The Stores and the great Cathedral — The pretty Girls of Lima — Their odd Customs and Costumes — Lima on Horseback — Women who Ride Astride — A City where Mules take the place of the Huckster Cart;

12. Down the Andes on a Hand-Car. An Exciting Trip from the Mountain-Tops to the Pacific ocean over the steepest Railroad in the World — Its Track climbs upwards of Three Miles in less than a Hundred — Its Cost in Money and Lives — The Scenic Wonders of the Andes — How One feels Three Miles above the Sea — The Horrors of Soroche, or Mountain Sickness — A Snowball fight in the Clouds — On the Eastern Side of the Andes.;

13. In the Heart of the Andes. The Journey up the Mountains from Mollendo to Puno — Across the Pampa de Islay — A Visit to Arequipa, the chief City of Southern Peru — The Harvard Observatory, and its wonderful Photographs of the Southern Heavens — Mount Misti, the highest Meteorological Observatory on Earth — The Plateau of Peru, and its Curious People.;

14. Steamboating above the Clouds. Lake Titicaca, the highest of Navigable Waters — It is half as large as Lake Erie, and twice as high up in the air as Mount Washington — How steel Steamers were brought to it on the Backs of Men and Mules over Passes higher than Pike’s Peak — Its Sacred Islands, and their wonderful Ruins — The Curious Inhabitants who Live upon its Shores — Balsas, or Native Boats made of Straw — Curious Animals about Titicaca — The Llama, the Vicuna, and the Alpaca;

15. The Wonderful City La Paz. Strange Features of Life and Business in the Heart of Bolivia — The Indians and the Cholos — Mules and Donkeys as Beer-Waggons, Bread-Carts, and Hearses — A Visit to the Markets — The Curious Vegetables and Fruits of Interior South America — Frozen Potatoes — Beans that taste like Ice-Cream, and Indian Corn that makes Flour without Grinding;

16. The Aymara Indians. The Curious People who Live on the Plateau of Bolivia — A Nation of Slaves who are contented with Slavery — A Peep into their Huts — Their Feuds, and how they Fight with Slings — About Coca, the favourite Indian Chew — Chicha, or Bolivian Beer — Goats skinned alive to make Brandy Bottles.;

17. In the Back Woods of Bolivia. An Unexplored Country of vast Resources given up to Savage Tribes — The Cannibals of the Eastern Andes, who Shoot with Blow-Guns and Poisoned Arrows — Some Indians who go Naked, and Others who Dress in Bark Clothing — The Rubber Forests of the Andean Slope — Quinine arid Peruvian Bark;

18. A Wild Ride with the Bolivian Mails. A Gallop over the dried-up Sea of the Middle Andes — Strange Scenes on the Highlands — The Bolivian Coachman, and his Cruelty — Nights in Bolivian Inns — Odd Features of Farming, where Oxen pull the Ploughs with their Heads — American Trade in Bolivia;

19. Among the Gold and Silver Mines of the Andes. Bolivia’s enormous Silver Output — It has produced $4,000,000,000 worth of the Metal — The Silver Mountain of Potosi and the rich Mines of Cerro de Pasco — The Gold Mines of Eastern Bolivia — The Tipuani Placer Deposits now being Worked by Americans — Prospecting in the Andes — The richest Tin Mines in the World ;

20. A Chemical Laboratory of the Gods. The Nitrate Deserts of Chile, in which the English have Invested $100,000,000 — How Nitrate of Soda is Mined — A Visit to the Fields — The Extent of the Deposits, and the Peculiarities of the Nitrate Towns — A Look at Ascotan, the Borax Lake of the Andes — Six Hundred Miles by Rail over Salty Plains.;

21. Among the Chilenos. The Yankees of South America, and their Country — Odd Features of the Slimmest Land in the World — Its Wonderful Riches — Its Vast Deposits of Guano, Gold, Silver, and Copper — Valparaiso, the New York of the Southern Pacific.;

22. On Robinson Crusoe's Island. The Scene of Alexander Selkirk’s adventures — The Island of Juan Fernandez, and how the Chilean Government proposes to Colonize it — The Guano Islands, out of which Peru has dug Millions — What Guano is — The Galapagos Islands, and the Robinson Crusoe of Ecuador;

23. The City of Santiago. Special Features of Life and Business in the Chilean Capital — A Bird’s- Eye view from Santa Lucia — Palaces that cover Acres and cost Fortunes — A Street-Car Ride for a Cent — High Life among the Chilenos — Paris Dresses and Diamonds — How the Nabobs enjoy themselves — Scenes at the Opera and the Races.;

24. The President of Chile. A Visit to the Chilean « White House » — The President and Congress — How Chile is Governed — The Influence of the Church, and its great Wealth — Its vast Ecclesiastical Property in Santiago, and its rich Nuns and Monks — Education in Chile, and the American Schools.;

25. Farming on a Grand Scale. A Land where a Thousand Acres are only a Garden-patch, and many Farms are worth Millions — Special Features of Life on the Haciendas — Peons who Work for Twenty Cents a Day and get Drunk every Week — Their extraordinary Strength and the great Mortality among them— A Visit to an immense Estate managed by a Woman — The Wheat Lands of Chile — Its Fine Cattle and Horses ;

26. Life on the Chilean Frontier. How the Southern Part of the Country is being opened up to Settlement — Government Auctions, where Land is sold in lots of Thousands of Acres — A Look at the frontier City of Temuco, and something about Concepcion, the Metropolis of the South — The Chances for Investment — Big Farms at low Prices — Valuable Mines — A Journey into the Coal Mines under the Pacific Ocean on an Electric Trolley;

27. The Araucanian Indians. Odd Features of Life among the Richest and Bravest of the South American Indians — A Visit to their Reservations in South Chile — Pretty Indian Maidens — How they are Courted and Married — Curious Customs of Birth and Death — The Araucanian Religion — An Araucanian Woman, who claims to be 130 Years Old;

28. At the Tail End of Our Hemisphere. A Trip through Smyth’s Channel into the Strait of Magellan — Sailing amidst the Clouds among Icebergs and Andean Snows — A Look at Cape Froward, the southernmost Continental Point in the World — The Savages of Patagonia — The naked Alacalufes, who live in Canoes — Lassoing an Iceberg — A Description of the Strait and its magnificent Scenery;

29. In the Capital of the Magellans. How the People live and do Business in the most Southerly City in the World — Lots which formerly Cost a Postage Stamp now worth Thousands of Dollars — The Big Sheep Farms of Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego, some of which Feed Flocks of Tens of Thousands and make Fortunes for their Owners — Vultures that pick out the Eyes of Live Sheep — The Panthers and the Indian Sheep-Stealers;

30. Tierra del Fuego. New Facts about one of the least-known parts of the World — An Island covered with a Dense Vegetation, having Mighty Forests and Grass-Grown Plains — Where the Gold Mines' are Located, and how Nuggets and Scales of Gold are Picked out of the Sands of the Sea — The Indians of Tierra del Fuego — The Onas, who go Naked, Sleep in Holes in the Ground, and Wage War upon the Whites — The Yaghans, who are Semi-Civilized — Their Wonderful Language;

31. In the Falkland Islands. John Bull’s new Naval Station in the South Atlantic — It Controls Cape Horn and the Strait of Magellan — Where the Falklands Are — Their Vast Sheep Farms, which are Managed by Shepherds on Horseback — A Visit to Stanley, the Capital — Travelling School-masters — Postal Savings Banks and other Features of the thriftiest Island Community in the World.;

32. The Argentine Republic. A Bird’s-Eye View of the Country — Its Vast Wheat-Fields, Sugar Plantations, and Extensive Pastures — How it Compares with the United States — Its People, and their Characteristics — The Latin-American as a National Type — How Argentina is Growing — Its Railroads and Telegraphs — Its Normal Schools, founded by Yankee School-Teachers;

33. Buenos Aires. The Metropolis of South America, and the largest Spanish-speaking City in the World — How it Contro’s Argentina Politically, Socially, and Financially — Buenos Aires from the Housetops — A Town of Shreds and Patches — A Look at its Churches — The Largest Catholic City on Earth — A South American Botany Bay;

34. High Life in Argentina. How the Nabobs of Buenos Aires look, act, and live — A Nation of Gamblers, who spend Millions a Year on Races, Lotteries, and the Stock-Exchange — Behind the Scenes at the Clubs — A Night at the Opera — Well-Dressed Women and Impudent Young Men — Curious Customs of Courtship and Marriage — Odd Features of Family Life;

35. Low Life in Argentina. How the Poor Live — The Conventillos of Buenos Aires, and their Miserable Inhabitants — Work, Wages, and Trades Unions — The Chances for Women — Strange Ways of Washing and Ironing — Among the Gauchos or Cowboys of the Pampas- — A Peep into their Homes — Their Terrible Duels — I Feel like killing Some One;

36. Odd Argentine Customs. The Hospitality of the People — Presents with Strings to Them — The Cemeteries and Funeral Customs — How the Dead are filed away in Pigeon-Holes — Rented Graves — Curious Gastronomic Tastes — Snails and Armadillos as Tidbits — The Greatest Meat-Eaters in the World — How Turkeys are Sold — Milkmen who cannot Water their Milk;

37. The Wheat-fields of Argentina. Where they are, and What they are — Plow the Grain is Raised and Marketed — The Wheat Farmers are Italians, who live in Mud Huts — Rosario, the Chicago of South America — The Locusts that come from Brazil in Swarms and eat up the Wheat and everything Green — How they are Destroyed — The Future of Wheat-Raising in South America, and its probable Competition with the United States;

38. Sheep and Stock-Raising in Argentina. Argentina has more than 100,000,000 Sheep, and produces a Hundred Pounds of Wool to each of its Inhabitants — A Look into the greatest Produce Market in the World — How Argentina is improving her Cattle and Sheep — A Ram which Cost $2,000, and Bulls at $5,000 Each — A Visit to the largest Meat-Freezing Establishment in the World ;

39. How the Argentine Republic is Governed. Its President and Congress — Elections held on Sundays in the Churches — Everything in the hands of Rings — Politicians who steal Millions — The Frauds of the National Banks — The Judicial System and the Police — The Army and Navy;

40. Across South America on the Trans--Andean Railroad. Concerning the Trans-Andean Railroad, which crosses Chile and Argentina — How the Track climbs the Andes — Snow-Sheds cut out of solid Rock, and other curious Features of Railroad-Building — Groceries on Wheels, and Freight Cars with Sails — A Look at Aconcagua, the highest of the Andes — Singular Features of Nature on the Pampas, where it sometimes Rains Mud;

41. The United States and Argentina. What should be Done to Better our Trade — We need American Steamers and an International American Bank — How the English are making Money in South American Banking — Stock Speculation in Buenos Aires — A Day on the Exchange — Opportunities for Investments;

42. Up the Paraguay River : A Thirteen-Hundred-Mile Trip on the Rio de la Plata system into the Heart of South America — How the Rio de la Plata surpasses the Mississippi — The Parana River, and its Ten Thousand Islands, which are floating down to the Sea — Strange Sights on the Paraguay River — Monkeys, Parrots, Jaguars, and Crocodiles — Life on the River Steamers — Peculiar Table Manners;

43. In the City of Asuncion. [= Asunción] A Walk through the Capital of Paraguay- — A Town older than any in North America, but still new — Its Telephones and Telephone Girls — A General View of Paraguay— Its Cities, Towns, and Villages— Its Queer Colonies, one of which was named after President Hayes.;

44. The Pretty Girls of Paraguay. Strange Customs of a Land where there are more Women than Men — The War with Brazil, that Killed off the Men — How the Women Manage the Country — Their Business Ability — A Visit to the Markets — Orange Girls and Butcher Women — A Look into a Paraguayan Home — Paraguay Tobacco, used by Women and Children who both Smoke and Chew;

45. Industrial Paraguay. Its Resources and Possibilities — A Land of vast Pastures and many Cattle — Its Dense Forests of valuable hard Woods- — Its Tobacco and Cotton Fields — Low Prices of Land — The Chances for Americans and American Trade;

46. Round about Pirapo. Strange Adventures in the Wilds of Paraguay — A Night in a Country Hotel — Paraguay’s only Railroad, and its odd Passengers — How Women Peddle raw Meat at the Stations — Country Scenes — Tens of Thousands of Ant-hills — A Land where Oranges grow wild — Odd Features of Life outside the Cities;

47. In the Wilds of Brazil. The Trip up the Paraguay into the Province of Matto Grosso — A Look at Cuyaba — A Stop at Corumba — Tigers and Alligators — Savage Indians who are Born without Hair and Grow Hair only on the Head — Something about the Chaco and its Curious Tribes — The Tobas, Lenguas, and others.;

48. In the Little Land of Uruguay. A Bird's-Eye View of the smallest of the South American Republics — The richest Land south of the Equator — A Look at Montevideo and its beautiful Harbour — Its Public Buildings, its Theatres, Banks, and Stock-Exchange — How Uruguay is Governed — Its Post Offices, Telephones, Telegraphs, and Schools — Strange Street Scenes;

49. The President of Uruguay. He lives upon a Political Volcano and is always in Danger of Assassination — A Land of Revolutions — An Evening at the « White House of Montevideo guarded by Gatling guns on the Roof — High Life in the Uruguayan Capital — Queer Customs of Courtship and Marriage — How the young Men play the Dragon, and why there are no Breach-of- Promise Suits.

50. The Baby Republic of Brazi. The Portuguese half of South America — An enormous Country of Vast Resources — Travels through West Deutschland — Thriving Cities and vast Pastures owned by Germans — A Visit to the Death Harbour of Santos — How Coffee is loaded for America — Up the Mountains to Sao Paulo, the great Coffee Metropolis.;

51. A Visit to the Largest Coffee Plantation : An Estate which has 5,000,000 Coffee Trees, and is Forty Miles around — How the Soil looks, and how the Coffee Trees are grown — Picking Coffee, and preparing it for the Market — A Ride over the Plantation on its Railroad — Its Italian Colonies, and how they are Managed — Among the Pretty Coffee-sorters;

52. More about Coffee: Brazil, the chief Coffee-country of the World — It Produces two-thirds of all the Coffee used by Man — Where the Coffee-fields are, and how the -Product is handled at Rio and Santos — The Kinds of Coffee, and why our Mocha and Java Coffees come from Brazil — Behind the Scenes in the Warehouses — How the Beans are Polished and Painted up for the Market — Coffee Detectives and Coffee Thieves;

53. In Rio de Janeiro : The largest Portuguese city in the World — A Look at the Harbour of Rio, and a Visit to its Botanical Gardens — A Walk on the Ouvidor — Strange Street Scenes — Auctions and Lotteries — A Visit to the Markets — Life in the Restaurants and Cafes — What Good Coffee is — A nervous Nation, always on the Twitch;

54. In the Switzerland of Brazil: Petropolis, the Summer Resort of the Capital — A Trip up the Organ Mountains on a Cog Railroad — Where our Minister lives, and where Dom Pedro had his Palaces — An American College for Girls — Woman’s Rights in Brazil, and some Peculiarities of Brazilian Women;

55. Bahia , and the Diamond Mines : How the Precious Stones are Dug out of the Rivers of Brazil — Mined by Native Indians, who Dive for the Diamond Gravel — Concerning the Carbons, or Black Diamonds, found near Bahia — The Gold Mines of Minas Geraes, and the new Gold Regions of Northern Brazil — The old City of Bahia, once the Brazilian Capital — Its 200,000 People, most of whom are Coloured — American Gold Dollars as Vest Buttons;

56. Up the Coast of Brazil : Peculiar Features of life on a Brazilian Steamer — The city of Pernambuco, and its wonderful Reef — A great Cotton Country — Brazil’s new Cotton Factories, and their enormous Profits — A visit to Ceara and its Capital, Forteleza — Terrible Famines — The Carnauba Palm, which Houses, Feeds, and Lights the People ;

57. On the Mighty Amazon : Travelling on an Ocean Steamer up the greatest Valley in the World — The wonderful size of the Amazon — Its many Tributaries, and its floating Islands — Steaming through the Delta — Flow the River looks a Thousand Miles from the Sea — Sketches of the People and their Homes — The Floods in the Amazon Basin, the Rainiest part of the World — The Cacao Plantation, and how Chocolate is Raised.;

58. The Great Cities of the Amazon : Some features of Para and Manaos [= Manaós = Manaus], which control the Trade of the Valley — High and Low Life at the Amazon’s Mouth — Manaos, the Metropolis of the Rio Negro — An Ocean Port a Thousand Miles from the Atlantic — A town of Electric Railroads, Telephones, and Charitable Institutions — Iquitos, on the Peruvian Amazon, a Steamship Port 2,300 miles inland.;

59. In the India-Rubber Camps: A visit to the Rubber forests, and a description of how the Trees are tapped for the Markets — How Rubber is made — Who owns the Trees — Something about the Rubber Slaves of the Upper Amazon — The Cost of Rubber, and how I made an ounce at a cost of $100.;

60. Brazil and the United States: Chances for American Capital — The Banks, and their enormous Profits — Railroads that Pay — Cold-Storage Plants — Steamship Companies that discriminate against our Trade;

61. In the Guianas: Where the Guianas are, and what they are — Their wild Lands, and their savage Indians and bush Negroes — British Guiana, and its mixed Population — A land of Hindus, Chinese, and Negroes — The rich Sugar plantations, and how they are Managed — Dutch Guiana, the little Holland of South America — French Guiana, and its Penal Colony — A look at Georgetown, Paramaribo, and Cayenne.;

62. Venezueala , and the Orinoco Basin : An Enormous Country of great Possibilities — How Named — Its Sugar lands and Cacao Orchards — Its Coffee, which we drink as Mocha — The Orinoco, and its vast Pastures — How the Llanos look — The Gold regions — On Lake Maracaibo — In Caracas, the National Capital.

With index.

Tear to front pastedown, else very good. 50.00

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16 CARTER, Henry Rose CARTER, Laura Armistead FROST, Wade Hampton Yellow Fever : An Epidemiological and Historical Study of Its Place of Origin. First Edition in dustjacket
Williams & Wilkins Company, Baltimore, 1931, 1931 
CARTER, Henry Rose. Yellow Fever : An Epidemiological and Historical Study of Its Place of Origin. Edited by Laura Armistead Carter and Wade Hampton Frost., Baltimore : The Williams & Wilkins Company, (August) 1931. First Printing. Pp (4),v-xii,(2),3-308,(4),+ 1 plate. Text illustrations and maps. Index. 8vo, blue cloth, gilt lettering to spine.

Garrison & Morton, Medical Bibliography (5th edition) 5468.

The disease yellow fever is defined, and using this definition, historical outbreaks of yellow fever are examined to determine if they really were yellow fever or not.

Contents :
Part I - The epidemiology of yellow fever.
1. Conditions requisite for the continued existence of yellow fever.
2. Dispersion and geographical distribution of Aedes Aegypti.
3. Dispersion and geographical distribution of yellow fever.
4. Relation of temperature and sociological conditions to the occurrence and persistence of yellow fever.

Part II - Diseases which have, or might have, been confused with yellow fever in the past.

Part III - The place of origin of yellow fever.
1. General considerations.
2. Mexico: records.
3. Mexico: tierra fria.
4. Mexico: tierra caliente.
5. The Maya country: cultures and records of pestilences (Maya Cimlal and Xekik).
6. The Maya country: coming of the Spaniards.
7. The Maya country: the epidemic of 1648 in Yucatan.
8. Hayti (Hispaniola).
9. The Isthmus of Panama: expeditions of Ojeda and Nicuesa.
10. The isthmus of Panama: the colony at Darien.
11. Guadeloupe: The coup de Barre, 1635.
12. Yellow Fever in America after 1648.
13. Africa: general considerations.
14. West Africa: discovery and settlement.
15. Early records of sickness on the west African coast.
16. The island of Sao Thomé.
17. The Cape Verde Islands.
18. The Canary Islands and the epidemic in Van der Does' expedition, 1599.
19. Sickness in Africa considered to be certainly yellow fever.
20. The place of origin of yellow fever: summary.

Personal inkstamp, penned name and note, else very good in browned and spotted dustjacket. 100.00

Price: 100.00 CDN
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17 CARTER, Wallace G. Where the Incas Trod : A Panorama of Conquest and Development in Andean Lands. Canadian Edition in dustjacket
Morriss Printing, Victoria, BC, 1973, 
CARTER, Wallace G. Where the Incas Trod : A Panorama of Conquest and Development in Andean Lands. Victoria, B.C. : Morriss Printing Co. Ltd., 1973. First Edition. Pp 269. Illustrated. 8vo, blue cloth. "As his ship proceeds down the coast, he acts as a cicerone, regaling his readers with a host of entertaining facts. First there is a capsule history of The Pacific Steam Navigation Co., so long identified with the development of South America. Thenas his ship passes through the Panama Canal, we learn how this great engin eering feat was accomplished. Then the Orca proceeds southward past Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Chile, calling at many unusual ports." - from the dj. Very good in dustjacket. 28.00

Price: 28.00 CDN
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18 CHALONER & FLEMING, Mahogany and Timber Brokers Mahogany Tree : Its Botanical Characters, Qualities and Uses, with Practical Suggestions for Selecting and Cutting It in the Regions of Its Growth [...] the Supply of Fire Timber for Ship-Building and All Other Purposes
Rockliff and Son / Effingham Wilson, Liverpool / London , 1851, 
(CHALONER & FLEMING, Mahogany and Timber Brokers). The Mahogany Tree : Its Botanical Characters, Qualities and Uses, with Practical Suggestions for Selecting and Cutting It in the Regions of Its Growth, in the West Indies andCentral America, with Notices of the Projected Interoceanic Communications of Panama, Nicaragua, and Tehuantepe, in Relation to Their Productions, an d the Supply of Fire Timber for Ship-Building and All Other Purposes; with a Map and Illustrations. And an Appendix, Containing the Documents Presented to the Lloyd's Committee of Registry, in Favour of the Use of Mahogany, for the Building of First-Class Vessels. Liverpool : Rockliff and Son / London : Effingham Wilson, n.d. [Preface dated 31st December, 1850]. Pp (2),[i]-ix,(10,[5]-117,(1), frontis + 6 plates + folding table. 8vo, blue pressed cloth, gilt lettering to spine. Contents : Intriduction. I. Region in whichthe Mahogany Tree grows. II. The Countries through which the communication s from the Atlantic to the Pacific will be opened [includes projects for canals, railways, and Macadamized roads]. III. Geographical Position. IV. History of the Mahogany Tree [including First used by Cortez, for Shipbuilding, around the year 1521 – By Sir W. Raleigh, in 1597 – By Captain Dampier, in 1681]. V. On the use of Mahogany for Shipbuilding, Church and House Building, Machinery, Railway, &c., Carriages, Dock Gates, Carving, and other purposes. VI. Remarks on the Selection, Qualities, and Dimensions of Mahogany.Appendices [including No. 4 – Documents Presented to Lloyd's Committee for the Registry of British and Foreign Shipping, in support of the Memorials of the Honduras Merchants claiming the insertion of Mahogany as a first-rate wood in the Tables for the construction of vessels of the 12 years' grade. No. 5 – Tables of the comparative displacement, by a vessel of 1000 tons register, when built of British Oak, or of Honduras Mahogany. No. 7 – Tableof Timber to be used in the Building of Vessels of the Classes for 12 and 10 years, as permitted by the Rules of the Lloyd's Committee of Registry for the year 1850]. Lacking the Map of the West Indies and Central America atrear, cloth rubbed, corners bumped, spine browned, occasional light foxing , a little shaky, else good. Signed with inscription by Edward Chaloner, dated 1852. Scarce. 300.00

Price: 300.00 CDN
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19 CHANSON, Julio R. Technical Marine Law sof the Republic of Panama (Vol. II).
Panama, 1988, 
CHANSON, Julio R. Technical Marine Laws of the Republic of Panama (Vol. II). Prepared for the Directorate General of Consular and Maritime Affairs andthe Minister of Finance and Treasury of the Republic of Panama. N.pl.: n.p ., [1988]. Pp. 131. Double column. 4to, red cloth, gilt lettering to front and spine. Very good in dustjacket. 50.00

Price: 50.00 CDN
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20 COLE, Ronald H. Operation Just Cause : The Planning and Execution of Joint Operations in Panama, February 1988 - January 1990. First Edition
Joint History Office, Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, Washington, D.C., 1995, 
COLE, Ronald H. Operation Just Cause : The Planning and Execution of Joint Operations in Panama, February 1988 - January 1990. Washington, D.C.: JointHistory Office, Office of the Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, 1995. First Edition. Pp (2),i-v,(1),[1]-88,+ 2 maps (1 folding). Index. 4to, pur ple-trimmed white card covers, lettered in black. Contents : 1. Background of the Crisis Before Noriega; The Rise of Noriega; Contingency Planning Begins, February-November 1988; Nullifying the May 1989 Elections; Operation NIMROD DANCER; A Get Tougher Policy: National Security Directive 17; New Leadership and New Plans; The Failed Coup, 3 October 1989. 2. After the Coup Attempt: Accelerated Joint Planning and Preparation, 3 October-5 December 1989 : General Thurman's Decisions, 3-20 October 1989; USCINCSO OPORD 1-90 (BLUE SPOON), 30 October 1989; JTFSO OPLAN 90-2, 3 November 1989; Rehearsals and a Bomb Threat, 7 October-15 December 1989. 3. Trigger Events, The Decision to Intervene and Final Preparations for H-Hour, 15-19 December 1989 : Trigger Events, 15-16 December 1989; Key Military Meetings, Sunday Morning, 17 December 1989; Decision at the White House, Sunday Afternoon, 17 December 1989; Monday, 18 December 1989: Movement Preparation, the F-117A Decision, and the Execute Order; Tuesday, 19 December 1989: Launching the Airlift. 4. D-Day, Wednesday, 20 December 1989 : Opposing Forces ; Actions by the Special Operations Forces; The Conventional Task Forces; Explanation and Justification. 5. Issues in the National Military Command Center: Civil AffairsReservists, the Media Pool, and U.S. Hostages : Inside the National Milita ry Command Center; Civil Affairs; The Media Pool; The Hostage Issue. 6. Last Combat, Civil Affairs, and the Hunt for Noriega, 21-24 December 1989 : Last Combat with the PDF; Civil Affairs and PROMOTE LIBERTY; The Hunt for Noriega. 7. The Nunciatura, 24 December 1989-3 January 1990 : An Overview; Rules of Engagement for Cordoning Off the Nunciatura; Rock Music at the Nunciatura; Contretemps over Cuban and Nicaraguan Diplomatic Privileges; Negotiations with the Vatican. 8. The End of Organized Resistance, the Shift to Nationbuilding and Redeployment, December 1989-3 January 1990 : End of the Fighting; Civil Affairs and the Question of Redeployment. 9. Assessments : Some Preliminary Assessments, January-April 1990; The Impact of Goldwater-Nichols on JUST CAUSE. Very good. 30.00

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