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Catechism of Geography; Divided into Two Parts : Adapted to every age and capacity, and to every class of Learners, either in Ladies' or Gentlemen's Schools : Part Second, containing Asia, Africa, and America, BROMLEY, Walter, comp.
1 BROMLEY, Walter, comp. Catechism of Geography; Divided into Two Parts : Adapted to every age and capacity, and to every class of Learners, either in Ladies' or Gentlemen's Schools : Part Second, containing Asia, Africa, and America
Acadian School, Halifax, 1822, 
BROMLEY, Walter, (comp.). A Catechism of Geography; Divided into Two Parts : Adapted to every age and capacity, and to every class of Learners, either in Ladies' or Gentlemen's Schools : Part Second, containing Asia, Africa, and America. Halifax : Printed at The Acadian School, 1822. Pp. [1]-132. 8vo, blue-grey card covers with white spine.
"[This Geography is printed in two parts only instead of four as was originally intended.]" - beneath the imprint on the title-page.

Sabin 8196.
Not in TPL, Egoff, Amtmann, Osborne, Tennyson, or Finley, Education in Canada: A Bibliography.
Robert Long, Nova Scotia Authors and Their Work, p.38 though only in this somewhat unhelpful form : "A Catechism of Geography; in Two Parts" (Halifax, 1822).
British North America is covered in pp.85-100.
Of New Brunswick interest: p. 91.
Of Nova Scotia interest: pp. 91-97.
Of Newfoundland, Cape Breton, and Prince Edward Island interest: 97-100.

"Bromley’s Royal Acadian School, which opened in Halifax in 1813–14, represented an important departure in education for the colonies. It was non-sectarian and, like the local bible society, drew as its supporters a cross-section of local society comprised of liberal-minded elements both inside and outside the Church of England. Although the aim of the school was to attack illiteracy, encourage morality, and promote industry, it also challenged the existing notions of privilege and authority in society. The controversy inspired by Anglican opposition to its establishment one of the school’s leading critics was Judge Alexander Croke – would have daunted a lesser mortal than Bromley. Instead, acting as both teacher and administrator, he thrived on the publicity his efforts aroused. The opponents of denominational privilege, led by Thomas McCulloch, rallied to his side. His school also benefited from being in the right place at the right time and proved to be an important social experiment. It combined under one roof inexpensive education for the children of the emergent middle class, free education for the children of the poor during the serious depression that followed the Napoleonic Wars, and a workshop for the unemployed at a time when local society had not yet begun to cope with the relief of the able-bodied poor."

["Despite constant financial uncertainties, the school continued to attract the patronage of the city’s élite and a clientele of shopkeepers and artisans whose children’s educational prospects were extremely precarious in a town without public schooling. Because it was neither a charity school nor a private school, Bromley’s institution represented the inauguration of a middle way in education much needed by the town’s nascent bourgeoisie. The Royal Acadian School was one of the first institutions of colonial society in which middle-class self-interest and the interests of an increasingly middle-class society could be combined. Here charity pupils – black and immigrant – and fee-paying pupils –the sons and daughters of rising Halifax families (both Protestant and Cat holic) – were put through their paces in the three Rs, religion, and vocational training. Parents relished the opportunity to secure a modestly priced education for their children, and for the pupils the Royal Acadian School provided an invaluable start in life." - from Judith Fingard's Dictionary of Canadian Biography entry on Bromley (VII:107-110).

See also Fingard's "English Humanitarianism and the Colonial Mind : Walter Bromley in Nova Scotia, 1813-1825," in The Canadian Historical Review, Vol.LIV, No.2, June 1973. Pp 123-151 with a mention of this work along with The English Grammar Made Easy [...] as "the extant manuals" published for the students of the school(footnote 44, pp.132-3).

A sample from the Nova Scotia section:
Q. What are the inhabitants of Nova Scotia? A. The inhabitants are a mixture of English, Scotch, Irish, Welch, Dutch, Germans, French, and a considerable numberof Emigrants from the United States of America; also some native Indians; and emancipated negroes brought from the United States of America during the late war: these last reside near Halifax, and appear very poor and miserable.

Q. What Seminaries of learning have been established in Nova Scotia? A. There are in Halifax a Grammar School, the National or Madras School, the Acadian or Lancastrian School, the Catholic School, and the Dalhousie Coll ege; the latter unfinished. Besides these, in rural situations, there are King's College and its Academy, at Windsor, and the Pictou Academy.

Q. What is the disposition of the Indians? A. The Indians of Nova Scotia, called Micmac, are harmless unless provoked, and their honesty is proverbial. They are of the middle stature, faces broad, aquiline nose, coarse black hair, and complexion nearly of a copper colour. Their covering is a blue frock or coat, with a girdle tied round the waist, with trowsers of the same for the men; and a blanket with a blue cloth petticoat, and a cap resembling a sugar-loaf, ornamented with beads, generally compose the dress of the women.

Q. What are their habits? A. The men are by no means so dissipated in their habits as some prejudiced or uninformed Authors have represented them; and while it must be admitted that there are many confirmed drunkards in the neighbourhood of Halifax, yet it is also certain, that there still exists a considerable proportion of sober, intelligent characters in various parts of the country, who are by no means averse to agricultural pursuits, as has been recently proved by actual experiment. ---------

Front cover missing, rear cover rubbed, smudged, and chipped, spine browned and starting to peel from the upper portion of the volume, edges browned with occasional smudging to text, else very good. Inside rear cover has the penned note "Elizabeth Liddells[illegible]" and the initials EL are also penned at the head of the title page.

One of the earliest surviving books for children printed in Canada. Very scarce. 7,000.00

Price: 7000.00 CDN
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2 Canada - Imprint - German - Broadside) Zum neuen Jahr unsers Herrn und Heylandes JESU CHRISTO Anno Domini, 1777. Will hierdurch ein Diener, JESU der Lieben Gemeinde zum bestaendigen Andencken und Liebe JESU reitzen
1777, 
(Canada – Imprint – German – Broadside). Zum neuen Jahr unsers Herrn und Heylandes JESU CHRISTO Anno Domini, 1777. Will hierdurch ein Diener, JESU derLieben Gemeinde zum bestaendigen Andencken und Liebe JESU reitzen : Auss. Luc. Am II. Cap. Und da acht Tage um wahren, dass dass Kind beschnitten wurde, da wurde seyn Nahme, genehut JESU, welcher genennet war von den Engel ehe Er in Mutter Leibe empfangen war : J.N.J. Kein Nahme ift so schon, als meines JESU Nahme, Weil Er auf Teutsch, so viel als Seelichmacher heist: Es ist auch diesses Kind der rechte Weibes Saame, Der unss den Weg zum ewigen Leben weist: Den Nahmen last unss tieff, in das Hertze graben, Und in der letzten Noth, in unssern Munde haben. Euer Wohl-Wunscher und Diener J.C. C.V.W. Broadside (10 by 7.75 inches), on laid paper, no watermark. Printed one side only, with decorative border.

Not in Tremaine.

Possibly the earliest known German imprint in Canada.

It is likely the work of Anthony Henry (Anton Heinrich, 1734-1800) the Nova Scotia printer and an immigrant of German extraction.

According to the DCB, "socially Henry mixed with the German element in Halifax and at one time was a warden of the little Dutch church."

We are guessing that the "C.V.W." is Carl Magnus von Wrangel who is sending a Christmas greeting from Sweden to either the Nova Scotian Lutheran community.
Whether he asked for it to be printed or it was a local initiative is unknown. The fact that the document is not printed in Fraktur would seem an argument that it was not printed in Pennsylvania, Deleware, or the other centres of American Lutheranism as Fraktur printing was by then quite common there. Also it was the time of the Revolutionary War, so contact would be minimal.

Vertical tear along most of central crease, three horizontal creases, wear and short tear to edges, a few brown spots, small tear hole in centre of document affecting the word “den” before ”Engel”, contemporary (?) penned note to back, else complete copy. As is.

Very scarce. 5,000.00



Price: 5000.00 CDN
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Journal of Transactions and Events during a Residence of nearly Sixteen Years on the Coast of Labrador; containing many interesting particulars, both of the Country and its Inhabitants, not hitherto known. In Three Volumes  First Edition. Large Paper Copy, CARTWRIGHT, George
3 CARTWRIGHT, George Journal of Transactions and Events during a Residence of nearly Sixteen Years on the Coast of Labrador; containing many interesting particulars, both of the Country and its Inhabitants, not hitherto known. In Three Volumes First Edition. Large Paper Copy
Newark, 1792, 1792 
CARTWRIGHT, George. A Journal of Transactions and Events during a Residenceof nearly Sixteen Years on the Coast of Labrador; containing many interesting particulars, both of the Country and its Inhabitants, not hitherto known. In Three Volumes. Newark: Printed and sold by Allin and Ridge, 1792. Folio (13 7/8" x 11 1/4"), 19th c. 1/2 calf, marbled boards. Volume I (comprising the First and Second Voyages): Pp. [2 p.l.], [iii] - viii (preface), [ix] - xvi (glossary), [l leaf] "Explanation of the Frontispiece", [6] (subscriber list), [1] - 272, 265 - 287 [i.e. signatures "M m" and "N n" are bothpaginated 265 - 272], frontis. portrait (supplied in facsimile), three fol ding maps (one supplied in facsimile); Volume II (comprising the Third and Fourth Voyages): pp. [i] - x (title page + glossary), [1] - 505; Volume III(comprising the Fifth and Sixth Voyages): pp. [i] - x (title page + glossa ry), [1] - 248, [1] - 15, ("Labrador: A Poetical Epistle"), tables ("A Diary of Farenheit's Thermometer"). This set has at beginning of Vol. I the Lane 1792 "Chart of Part of the Coast of Labrador" [the larger two-sheet version, 26 3/16" x 36 13/16" (66.5 x 93.5 cm.) overall] and the Lane 1790 "The Island of Newfoundland". One of 15 Large Paper Copies. O'Dea 245a, Cooke & Caron p.82, TPL 586, Davidson 139, Sabin 11150. "[...] it is clear from thelist of subscribers' names prefixed to volume one, that the size of the ed ition had been reduced from a thousand to 350 copies, [...]. Of the total number of copies printed, fifteen were run off as special large-paper copiesfavoured by bibliophiles, and these are now exceedingly rare and valuable items." - George Story's "Old Labrador: George Cartwright 1738-1819: A Lecture delivered to The Newfoundland Historical Society, Thursday, 9 October 1980". "This journal is written with care and fidelity; the style of the author is plain and manly; he delivers his sentiments with freedom, and with confidence, asserts only those circumstances which, from his own observations, he knows to be facts. [...] Coleridge highly recommended the work." - quoted in Maggs' Catalogue 678, in loc. "The annals of his campaigns among the foxes and beavers, interested me more than ever did the exploits of Marleborough [sic] or Frederick; besides I saw plain truth and the heart of Cartwright's book." - Coleridge, cited in Lande, (although it appears rather tohave been Robert Southey, according to G.M.Story, in his DCB article). It would be interesting to know how such a book came to be printed in Newark, a small borough town in Nottinghamshire. Despite Cartwright's connection with the town, one would have expected a London imprint for such a large project. John Feather's The English Provincial Book Trade before 1850, (Oxford,1981) has provided two possible sources: Thomas M. Blagg's Newark as a Pub lishing Town, (Newark, 1898) and John Walton's A Survey of the Printing Trade and Related Occupations in Nottingham and Nottinghamshire to 1900, (Library Association Fellowship thesis, 1968). So far the only notice we have found for the printer is the following: "1795, Jan. 4 Died, William Allen [sic], an eminent bookseller at Newark, in Nottinghamshire, aged sixty-two years" in C.H.Timperley's Encyclopaedia of Literary and Typographical Anecdote, (L., 1842), p.785. Vol. I: Lacks the original portrait frontispiece, as well as the map of "Northern and Middle States...and the British Dominions",but full-sized photocopies of these two on good paper have been obtained a nd laid-in. Both of the maps in Vol. I have a single four inch mended tear.Spine cracked at pp. 120/121, 3" tear to margin of pp. 7 - 8, 1" tear to m argin of pp. 21 - 22; pp. 121 - 128 and 205 - 217 are considerable foxed, extreme edges of last leaf showing some adherence of marbling from earlier binding, edges (especially where untrimmed) are darkened, otherwise very clean. Vol. II: Fore-edge of title page spotted (and extreme edges showing some adhering of marbling from earlier binding), two leaves loose (pp. 43 - 46), occasional light foxing (and small stained area affecting text of p. 173), edges (especially where untrimmed) are darkened, otherwise very clean throughout. Vol. III: Two leaves (pp. 3 - 6) loose, extreme top and fore-edgeof title page (and fore-edge of last leaf) show some adhering of marbling from earlier binding, some soiling to p. 169, some damp-staining to p. 222,edges (especially where untrimmed) are darkened, otherwise very clean thro ughout. Bindings: Heavy wear to bottom edges of boards, spines rubbed and worn at extremities, some loss of marbled paper where it overlaps the spine leather. In general, text very good, and in good serviceable bindings. the set for 9,000.00

Price: 9000.00 CDN
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Acadian Geology. First Edition, DAWSON, John William DAWSON, J. William
4 DAWSON, John William DAWSON, J. William Acadian Geology. First Edition
Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, 1855, 1855 
DAWSON, John William. Acadian Geology. Edinburgh : Oliver and Boyd [and] London: Simpkin, Marshall, and Co. [and] J. Dawson and Son, Pictou, N. S., 1855. First Edition. Pp. [i]-xii, [1]- 388 with four wood-engraved plates, 35 illustrations and large hand-coloured, engraved folding map "Geological Map of Nova Scotia, Prince Edward Island, and Part of New Brunswick". Small 8vo. Original brownish-violet cloth stamped in gilt and blind, and with gilt lettering to spine.

TPL 5663.

Chapters:
1. Introduction;
2. General Description of Nova Scotia;
3. Modern Alluvial Deposits;
4. The Drift, Diluvium or Boulder Formation;
5. The New Red Sandstone;
6. The New Red Sandstone (Continued);
7. The New Red Sandstone (Continued);
8. The Carboniferous System;
9. The Carboniferous System (Continued);
10. The Carboniferous System (Continued);
11. The Carboniferous System (Continued);
12. The Carboniferous System (Continued);
13.The Carboniferous System (Continued);
14. Devonian and Upper Silurian Systems;
15. Metamorphic District of the Atlantic Coast.
With Appendix.

Spine faded, fore-corners bumped, some wear to all extremities. Light to moderate water-staining affects lower margin of most leaves (as well as -- more detractingly so -- corresponding portions of the map). Very slight foxing to some leaves, map (apart from the waterstaining) is somewhat browned and having neatly repaired 2 1/2" tear affecting design. Neat ink signature of an early owner to top of title page.

A good to very good copy . 800.00



Price: 800.00 CDN
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5 HALIBURTON, Thomas C. Historical and Statistical Account of Nova Scotia, in Two Volumes. Illustrated by a Map of the Province, and Several Engravings. By Thomas C. Haliburton, Esq., Barrister at Law, and Member of the Houseof Assembly of Nova Scotia. Halifax
Published for Joseph Howe, Halifax , 1830, 
HALIBURTON, Thomas C. An Historical and Statistical Account of Nova Scotia,in Two Volumes. Illustrated by a Map of the Province, and Several Engravings. By Thomas C. Haliburton, Esq., Barrister at Law, and Member of the Houseof Assembly of Nova Scotia. Halifax : Published for Joseph Howe; and sold by C.H. Belcher; Robert Scholey, London; and Oliver & Boyd, Edinburgh, 1829. First Edition, Second Impression, Variant [1830? - the Extract is extended to 4 pp. by a further extract dated Jan.1830]. Pp (10),[iii]-viii, 1-340,[i]-viii,(2), folding map frontispiece + 2 plates, [pp 302-303 mispaginated a s 202-203]; (4), 1-456, frontispiece + 3 plates + 3 maps + 3 folding tables[p.164 mispaginated as 152; pp.175-176 mispaginated as 177-178]. 8vo, full brown half calf.

TPL 1542, Morley pp.74-75, Watters p.684, Rhodenizer p.55 8, NSIB 16.

Volume I is the history (in eight chapters with chapter VI beng"A Chronological Table of events connected with and illustrating the History of Nova Scotia, [From 1763 to 1828]" (pp.242-316)).

Map : "A New Map of Nova Scotia Compiled from the Latest Surveys Expressly for the Historical and Statistical Account, 1829". (frontis.).

Plates :
"Plan of the Town of Louisbourg" (opp. p.100);
"Plan ofthe Harbor and Fortifications of Louisbourg" (opp. p.207).

Volume II is the statistics, or more properly, descriptions, of each county and district, with much historical matter. Halifax, Dartmouth, Lawrencetown, & Preston (pp.10-34); District of Pictou (pp.50-60); Cape Breton (pp. 201-262); Sable Island (pp.262-273); Chapter VIII "An Historical Sketch of the Colonial Trade" (pp.377-389); Chapter IX "Of the Objectsof Natural History in Nova Scotia", including geology, minerals and mining (pp.390-453). Tables of distances, population, horned cattle, bushels of potatoes, &c., &c. Maps : "Shubenacadie Canal Line" (fldg, opp. p.28); "Proposed Canal from Bay Vert Cumberland Bason" (opp. p.73); "Proposed Canal from St.Peter's Bay to Bras d'Or Lake" (opp. p.239). Plates : "View of Halifax from Dartmouth Cove" (frontispiece); " Province House, Halifax, N.S." (opp. p. 17); "View of the Front Stret of Windsor" (opp. p.103); "View of the Port and Part of the Town of Annapolis" (opp. p.159). Three large fldg tables setat p.388 : "Comparative State of the General Trade of the Port of Nova Sco tia, in the Years 1807, 1814, 1821 and 1828" with details of import & exports for the province's ports; "Account of Customs Duties, &c collected for the Year 1828"; "General Account of Payments from the Treasury, for the Year1828"; "Statement of the ParticularTrade of the Port of Nova Scotia, in th e Years 1807, 1814, 1821 and 1828".

Lacking large folding map of Nova Scotia (being the frontis of Vol. I), and the small folding map of the Shubenacadie Canal (Vol. II), Province House plate (Vol. II), and 3 folding tables (Vol. II), lacking three of the four covers, what there is is severely worn,names and other marks to endpapers and an occasional note to text, penned name (?) clipped out from top of both title pages and the printed word “Scotia” cut out from both title pages, piece torn out from pp 207-208 with resulting loss of text, a few stains, foxing and smudging throughout, overall a poor, reading copy only. As is. 450.00

Price: 450.00 CDN
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Historical and Statistical Account of Nova Scotia, in Two Volumes. Illustrated by a Map of the Province, and Several Engravings. By Thomas C. Haliburton, Esq., Barrister at Law, and Member of the Houseof Assembly of Nova Scotia. Halifax, HALIBURTON, Thomas C.
6 HALIBURTON, Thomas C. Historical and Statistical Account of Nova Scotia, in Two Volumes. Illustrated by a Map of the Province, and Several Engravings. By Thomas C. Haliburton, Esq., Barrister at Law, and Member of the Houseof Assembly of Nova Scotia. Halifax
Published for Joseph Howe, Halifax , 1829, 1829 
HALIBURTON, Thomas C. An Historical and Statistical Account of Nova Scotia,in Two Volumes. [Two Volumes in One]. Illustrated by a Map of the Province , and Several Engravings. By Thomas C. Haliburton, Esq., Barrister at Law, and Member of the Houseof Assembly of Nova Scotia. Halifax : Published for Joseph Howe; and sold by C.H. Belcher; Robert Scholey, London; and Oliver & Boyd, Edinburgh, 1829. First Edition, Second Impression. Pp (2),[iii]-viii ,(4),[1]-340, [i]-viii, folding map frontispiece + 2 plates, [pp 302-303 mispaginated as 202-203]; (2), 1-456,(2), frontispiece + 3 plates + 3 maps + 3 folding tables [p.164 mispaginated as 152]. 8vo, rebound in one full brown calf volume, with original label to spine and new endpapers.

TPL 1542, Morley pp.74-75, Watters p.684, Rhodenizer p.558, NSIB 16.

Volume I is the history (in eight chapters with chapter VI being "A Chronological Table of events connected with and illustrating the History of Nova Scotia, [From 1763 to 1828]" (pp.242-316)). Map : "A New Map of Nova Scotia Compiled from the La test Surveys Expressly for the Historical and Statistical Account, 1829". (frontispiece). Plates : "Plan of the Town of Louisbourg" (opp. p.100); "Plan of the Harbor and Fortifications of Louisbourg" (opp. p.207).

Volume II is the statistics, or more properly, descriptions, of each county and district, with much historical matter.

Halifax, Dartmouth, Lawrencetown, & Preston(pp.10-34);

District of Pictou (pp.50-60); Cape Breton (pp. 201-262);

Sable Island (pp.262-273);

Chapter VIII "An Historical Sketch of the Colonial Trade" (pp.377-389);

Chapter IX "Of the Objects of Natural History in Nova Scotia", including geology, minerals and mining (pp.390-453).

Tables of distances, population, horned cattle, bushels of potatoes, &c., &c.

Maps : "Shubenacadie Canal Line" (folding, opp. p.28); "Proposed Canal from Bay Vert Cumberland Bason" (opp. p.73); "Proposed Canal from St.Peter's Bay to Bras d'OrLake" (opp. p.239).

Plates : "View of Halifax from Dartmouth Cove" (frontispiece);

"Province House, Halifax, N.S." (opp. p.17);

"View of the Front Street of Windsor" (opp. p.103);

"View of the Port and Part of the Town of Annapolis" (opp. p.159).

Three large folding tables set at p.388 :
"Comparative State of the General Trade of the Port of Nova Scotia, in the Years 1807, 1814, 1821 and 1828" with details of import & exports for the province's ports;

"Account of Customs Duties, &c collected for the Year 1828";

"General Account of Payments from the Treasury, for the Year 1828";

"Statement of the Particular Trade of the Port of Nova Scotia, in the Years 1807, 1814, 1821 and 1828".

Rebound in full brown calf with original spine label and new endpapers, some foxing and smudging, offsetting from plates and maps, else very good, solid. 1,000.00

Price: 1000.00 CDN
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Historical and Statistical Account of Nova-Scotia. variant. 2 vols., HALIBURTON, Thomas C.
7 HALIBURTON, Thomas C. Historical and Statistical Account of Nova-Scotia. variant. 2 vols.
Howe, 1830, 1830 
HALIBURTON, Thomas C. An Historical and Statistical Account of Nova Scotia,in Two Volumes. Illustrated by a Map of the Province and Several Engravings. By Thomas C. Haliburton, Esq., Barrister at Law, and Member of the Houseof Assembly of Nova Scotia. Halifax : "Published for Joseph Howe", 1829. First Edition, Second Impression, Variant [1830? - the Extract is extended to 4 pp. by a further extract dated Jan.1830]. Pp (8),[iii]-viii, 1-340, [i]-viii,(4), fldg map frontispiece + 2 plates, [pp 302-303 mispaginated as 202-203]; (6), 1-456,(4), frontispiece + 3 plates + 3 maps, + 3 fldg.plates [p.164 mispaginated as 152; pp.175-176 mispaginated as 177-178]. 8vo, dark brown half calf, black pebbled calf, rebound in later endpapers.

TPL 1542, Morley pp.74-75, Watters p.684, Rhodenizer p.558, NSIB 16.

Volume I the history (in eight chapters with chapter VI beng "A Chronological Table of events connected with and illustrating the History of Nova Scotia, [From 1763 to1828]" (pp.242-316)). Map : "A New Map of Nova Scotia Compiled from the La test Surveys Expressly for the Historical and Statistical Account, 1829". (frontispiece). Plates : "Plan of the Town of Louisbourg" (opp. p.100); "Plan ofthe Harbor and Fortifications of Louisbourg" (opp. p.207).

Volume II the statistics, or more properly, descriptions, of each county and district, with much historical matter. Halifax, Dartmouth, Lawrencetown, & Preston (pp.10-34); District of Pictou (pp.50-60); Cape Breton (pp. 201-262); Sable Island (pp.262-273); Chapter VIII "An Historical Sketch of the Colonial Trade" (pp.377-389); Chapter IX "Of the Objects of Natural History in Nova Scotia", including geology, minerals and mining (pp.390-453). Tables of distances, population, horned cattle, bushels of potatoes, &c., &c. Maps : "Shubenaca die Canal Line" (fldg, opp. p.28); "Proposed Canal from Bay Vert CumberlandBason" (opp. p.73); "Proposed Canal from St.Peter's Bay to Bras d'Or Lake" (opp. p.239).

Plates : "View of Halifax from Dartmouth Cove" (frontispiece); " Province House, Halifax, N.S." (opp. p.17); "View of the Front Stret of Windsor" (opp. p.103); "View of the Port and Part of the Town of Annapolis" (opp. p.159).

Three large folding tables set at p.388 : "Comparative State of the General Trade of the Port of Nova Scotia, in the Years 1807, 1814, 1821 and 1828" with details of import & exports for the province's ports; "Account of Customs Duties, &c collected for the Year 1828"; "General Account of Payments from the Treasury, for the Year 1828"; "Statement of the Particular Trade of the Port of Nova Scotia, in the Years 1807, 1814, 1821 and 1828".

Corners and spine worn, outer hinges of Vol.1 cracked, bookplates, names p enned to half-title and title pages of Vol.1, lacking half-title and title pages to Vol.2, lacking large folding map to Vol.1 and Shubenacadie Map, View of Halifax from Dartmouth Cove, and 3 large folding Tables from Vol.2., else vg. As is. 700.00

Price: 700.00 CDN
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Clockmaker, The. 1st UK + 2nd US eds, HALIBURTON, Thomas Chandler
8 HALIBURTON, Thomas Chandler Clockmaker, The. 1st UK + 2nd US eds
1837, 1837 
(HALIBURTON, Thomas Chandler). The Clockmaker; or The Sayings and Doings of Sam Slick, of Slickville. London : Richard Bentley, 1837. First UK Edition. Pp (4),[iii]-xii,[1]-367,(1). O'Brien 3, Logan 3, Lande 1814. - bound with - The Clockmaker; or The Sayings and Doings of Sam Slick, of Slickville. Second Series. Phil.: Lea & Blanchard, 1839. Second US Edition. Pp (2),[iii]-iv,5-192,(2). O'Brien 19, Logan 30. Large 12mo [110 x 175 mm], half-leather, marbled boards. Covered rubbed and scuffed, some foxing, else vg. With the following bookseller's oval rubberstamp [30 x 53 mm] at rear - "Zed.S.Hall, Bookseller, Book-binder, Stationer, &c. 57 Cor. Sackville & Barrington St. Halifax, N.S." 400.00

Price: 400.00 CDN
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Clockmaker, The ; or, The Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick, of Slickville. First edition, HALIBURTON, Thomas Chandler HOWE, Joseph
9 HALIBURTON, Thomas Chandler HOWE, Joseph Clockmaker, The ; or, The Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick, of Slickville. First edition
Joseph Howe, 1836, 1836 
HALIBURTON, Thomas Chandler. The Clockmaker ; or, The Sayings and Doings of Samuel Slick, of Slickville. Halifax, N.S.: Printed and Published by Josep h Howe, 1836. Pp (4),[v]-vi,[1]-221,(1). 12mo, red cloth, printed label to front board.

The first edition of one of the corner-stones of Canadian literature.

TPL 1963, Lande, 1814 & S1014, Watters p.219, NSIB 17.

"This first edition of The Clockmaker is excessively rare." - Lande, Supplement.

"The 1836 edition is rarely met with." - Logan p.157.

In original boards, but a modern matching spine and new end-papers. Has suffered some waterstaining tocloth and bottom corner of endpapers, but not affecting the text pages. Sm all section torn from margin of pp 51-52, light foxing, occasional small stains, corner creasing.
The front board-label has been rubbed to illegibility. Otherwise a solid specimen of a very scarce book. 3,000.00

Price: 3000.00 CDN
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Form of Prayer and Thanksgiving to Almighty God; to be used In all Churchesand Chapels of the Church of England throughout His Majesty's Province of Nova-Scotia, on Thursday, the Twenty-seventh Day of October, 1814 [...], Imprint -  John Howe
10 Imprint - John Howe Form of Prayer and Thanksgiving to Almighty God; to be used In all Churchesand Chapels of the Church of England throughout His Majesty's Province of Nova-Scotia, on Thursday, the Twenty-seventh Day of October, 1814 [...]
Printed by John Howe & Son, Printers to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, Halifax , 1814, 1814 
(Imprint – John Howe). A Form of Prayer and Thanksgiving to Almighty God; to be used In all Churches and Chapels of the Church of England throughout His Majesty's Province of Nova-Scotia, on Thursday, the Twenty-seventh Day of October, 1814, being the Day appointed by Proclamation for a General Thanksgiving to Almighty God : For putting an End to the long, extended, and bloody Warfare in which we were engaged against France and her Allies. By Command. Halifax : Printed by John Howe & Son, Printers to the King's Most Excellent Majesty, 1814. Pp (2),[3]-15,(1) including covers. 8vo (7.5 by 6 inches), printed stitched self-wraps.
Fleming NS104. Not in TPL.

Waterstain to fore-edge of front cover, edges browned, nicked and creased, a few brown spots, else very good. Scarce. 1,350.00


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Buch das gut, enthaltend den Katechismus, Betrachtung, Gesang., KAUDER, Christian and Pierre MAILLARD MAILLARD, Pierre
11 KAUDER, Christian and Pierre MAILLARD MAILLARD, Pierre Buch das gut, enthaltend den Katechismus, Betrachtung, Gesang.
1866, 
KAUDER, Christian. Buch das gut, enthaltend den Katechismus, Betrachtung, Gesang. "Die kaiserliche wie auch königliche Buchdruckerei hat es gedruckt in der kaiserlichen Stadt Wien in Oesterreich." 1866. [Volume containing manual of catechism, prayer book and instructions, psalms and hymns], printed in Mi'kmaq ideographs (figurative lettering). 3 vols. bound as 1. Vol. 1: pp. [xii] includes inspirational engraving (leaf i-ii]) + 146 includes inspirational engraving (leaf 1-2), and index (leaf 145-146); Vol 2: pp. 109 includes inspirational engraving (leaf 1-2), and half-title (leaf 3-4) + [1 leaf] (index); Vol. 3: 210 pp. includes inspirational engraving (leaf 1-2), half-title (leaf 3-4), and index (p. 210). Original dark green full morocco,boards ruled and decorated in gilt within blind ruled border, with front b oard having an additional ornamental and episcopal device in center, spine elaborately titled and decorated in gilt, a.e.g.

The text in Mi'kmaq ideographs is accompanied in places by German language headings. 12mo. (7 1/8" x 4 7/8"). Original tissue guards to all four engraved plates are present.

This copy is one of assumedly several richly bound copies which had been designated for Bishop Colin Francis Mackinnon of Arichat, within whose diocese Kauder had been working for the spiritual benefit of the native population.

The Bishop's Latin presentation inscription on flyleaf reads: "Viro Fortis simo E. M. Dodd Judici Episcopus Arichatencis Dono dedit 1869".

The recipient, Edmund Murray Dodds (1797 - 1876), was a member of the Nova Scotia Legislative Assembly and at the time he was presented with the book a judge of the Supreme Court of Nova Scotia. He co-authored, in 1845, a Report on the condition of the Micmac population in this island [i.e. Cape Breton, NS]. For MacKinnon (1810-1879) see DCB X:479-480; for Dodd, see DCB X:232-3. Pilling, Algonquin Languages, 2057-59. TPL Second Supp.:9464 (Der Katechismus only). Akins: (Das Gesangbuch only) p. 17.

Originally developed by Chretien Le Clerq during his 17th century ministry to the Mi'kmaqs of Gaspé, the Mi'kmaq ideographs were later improved upon by Pierre Maillard, missionary to the Mi'kmaqs of Eastern Nova Scotia during the midpart of the 18th century. Maillard was in very large part the composer of the manuals and song selec tions here comprising the three volumes of this book, and which had formerly been labouriously copied by hand and circulated among the Mi'kmaqs.

The printing of the manuals and songs was finally brought about in 1866 through the efforts of Christian Kauder and his Viennese sponsors.

Kauder, born in Luxembourg, was ordained in Europe in 1840 and had preached in a number of parishes in the United States. He was convalescing at the Trappist Abbey of Petit Clairvaux in Tracadie, Nova Scotia when he developed his learned and evangelical interest in ideographic language of the Mi'kmaq native peoples of the area. Through his direction, and under the enjoyment of generous sponsorship, the printing of Der Katechismus, Das Betrachtungsbuch, and Das Gesangbuch was achieved from ideographic type cast expressly for that purposein Vienna.

Writing in some detail of Kauder's undertaking, the Rev. Angus Anthony Johnston states, "The project took many years of work, for 5,703 type faces had to be specially cut. The printing finally began in 1865, and the work was completed by the end of 1866. The total cost - equivalent to $755 in the North American monetary value of the time -- was met by the Leopoldine Society of Vienna. 'Unluckily only the first shipment of these precious books ever reached America, while the great bulk of them was destroyed in a shipwreck'." -- Johnston, A History of the Catholic Church in Eastern Nova Scotia Vol. II, p. 448.

Apart from occurrences of the binding together of all three works in one volume, two of the three titles were commonly issued as separate volumes. As J.C. Pilling writes in his Bibliography of the Algonquian Languages, "I have seen copies of the Katechismus alone, the Gesangbuch alone, and the Katechismus and Betrachtungsbuch combined..." He also states, "So far as I know, these are the only books printed in these characters."

Inscription of subsequent owner to flyleaf reads: "Ce livre tiré à un petit nombre d'examplaires en à été offert comme souvenir d'amitié par la famille Dodd à Sydney (Ile du Cap Breton) le 30 Septembre 1882 / Edmund de Lapierre".

Amidst the rich ornamentation of the spine are the gilt impressions of six ideographic characters conforming in size to their letterpress impressions, suggesting that the binder whose work is represented here was located in Vienna.

Some scattered foxing affects the engraved plates and l eaves adjacent them. Binding moderately worn along extremities. A very good copy. 12,000



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Intellect, The Emotions, and The Moral Nature.  First Edition., LYALL, William
12 LYALL, William Intellect, The Emotions, and The Moral Nature. First Edition.
Thomas Constable and Co., Edinburgh, 1855, 1855 
LYALL, William, Rev. Intellect, The Emotions, and The Moral Nature. Edinburgh : Thomas Constable and Co. / London : Hamilton, Adams, and Co., MDCCCLV [1855]. First Edition. Pp (4),[v]- [I]-xii,[1]-627,(1),(4,ads). 8vo, original maroon pressed cloth, gilt title to spine.

TPL 8429, Watters p.807, Rhodenizer p.274, Slater, Bibliography of Modern American Philosophers 1855.

"The work merits recognition as one of the first Canadian books in this field" [i.e. philosophy] - DCB. Vol 11, p.534.

Rev. William Lyall was with the Free College, Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Partial contents (first 70 pages) :

I. Mind and matter, the two substances about which philosophy is conversant. -Importance of distinction between Matter and Mind. - Two classes of philosophers, according to the predominance assigned in their systems to Matter or Mind. - Consciousness the only immediate object of cognition. - Consciousness the starting-point of philosophy. - How the mind passes from a state of simple consciousness to the idea of self. -Descartes' Enthymeme. - The German "Ego". -The amount of Descartes' Enthymeme. Fichte's formula. -The idea of personal existence, the first idea of the awakening mind.

II. Origin of the Idea of Externality. - Dr. Brown's account of this idea. -Remarks on Dr. Brown's account of this idea. -Error of Dr. Brown in denying any peculiar intuition in order to this idea. -Special difficulty in regard to the mode of communication between Mind and Matter. -Vanity of attempting to account for this communication, or explain the mode of it. -The principle of common sense. -Coincidence between Reid, Oswald, and Beattie, and the French philosopher, Father Buffier.

III. The idea of Externality not that of an external world. -Origin of the idea of matter.

IV. Muscular resistance as distinguished from tactual. -Dr. Brown the first to take notice of this distinction. -Matter, what, as first apprehended by the mind. -Other properties of matter.-Idea of substance. Substance and quality distinguished. -The mind informe d of its own existence, and its own qualities, pari passu with its informations respecting matter. -This indicates the laws of our being.

V. The idea of Extension. -What gives us this idea. -The ideas of magnitude and figure.-How the infant mind is concerned in the attainment of its first or primit ive ideas. -Magnitude, figure, distance, not objects of sight. -Illustrations to show that these are acquired objects of vision, or connected with vision only by a process of association.

VI. Primary Qualities of Matter. Dr. Brown's view as to the primary qualities. -The secondary qualities of Matter. -Weights, or gravitation, a law rather than a property of matter. Weight but the action of gravitation. -The centripetal and centrifugal forces the two grand and prevading agencies in the universe. -The secondary qualities of matter but modifications of the primary, according to Locke. -Difference in the child's process of attaining its ideas from this point forward.

VII. Idea of Space. -Locke's account of this idea. - Reid's account of this idea. -What space is according to the German metaphysics. -What, according to Dr. Samuel Clarke. -Three particulars notices by Cousin in connexion with this idea. -Has space objectivity? -The idea of Time. - Locke's acount of the idea. -Origin of the idea according to Dr. Brown. - View of Cousin. -Merit of Locke, according to Cousin, in tracing the origin of this idea. -Though the notion of time derived from succession, not itself succession. -Time absolute. -The idea of Eternity. -Idea of Power. Origin of the idea. -Nature of the idea. Efficiency denied to power. - Barrow, Hobbs, Butler, and Berkeley, quoted by Dugald Stewart as denying efficiency in power. -The doctrine of Malebranche. -Atheism of Hume in denying efficiency to power. [etc.].

"LYALL, WILLIAM, Presbyterian clergyman, author, and professor; (b. 11 June 1811 in Paisley, Scotland, the third son of William Lyall, merchant; d. January 17 1890 in Halifax, Nova Scotia).

"William Lyall was educated at Paisley Grammar School and at the universities of Glasgow and Edinburgh. Early in life he was attracted to the study of philosophy and, although ordained a minister of the Free Church of Scotland, he made his mark as a philosopher rather than as a theologian. After serving Free Church congregations in Broxburn, West Lothian, Uphall, and Linlithgow, he immigrated to British North America in 1848. For the next two years he was tutor at Knox College, Toronto. He resigned in 1850 to become professor of mental and moral philosophy and classical literature at the Free Church College in Halifax. In 1860, following a union of Presbyterian churches, he was transferred to the Theological Seminary in Truro, N.S. When this institution closed in 1863 Lyall became professor of logic and psychology at Dalhousie College in Halifax,a position he held until his death. During Lyall’s years as a student the “philosophy of common sense” as developed by Thomas Reid and Dugald Stewart was pre-eminent in Scotland and it was to this school that he belonged. When Lyall wrote Intellect, the emotions, and the moral nature (1855), he was greatly influenced by Sir William Hamilton under whom he may have studied at Edinburgh. Although largely a synthesis of philosophical thought and not highly original, the work merits recognition as one of the first Canadian books in this field. For Lyall, philosophy was the handmaiden of religion, and he never strayed from currently held theological views.
“In the scriptures,” he wrote, “we have the only, the authoritative statement of man’s apostacy. Philosophy may speculate: the Bible reveals – not the mode or nature of change, but the circumstance of change. The great fact is told, the mod us of it is left unexplained.” His book attracted widespread attention and for a number of years was in vogue as a text in metaphysics. On the strength of this work, the West of Scotland Magazine in 1856 suggested Lyall as the successor to Sir William Hamilton in the chair of logic and metaphysics at Edinburgh. The magazine claimed that Lyall “had done much to confirm and strengthen the principles of Scottish philosophy” and that his writing displayed the erudition and talent which “eminently fitted him to succeed the great champion,” Hamilton. Nothing came of the proposal and Lyall remained in Nova Scotia. On 3 May 1864 he was awarded an honorary LL.D. from McGill College in Montreal and when the Royal Society of Canada was established in 1882 Lyall was named a founding fellow. In addition to his teaching duties,for which he was “in his own person a whole faculty of arts,” Lyall dabbled in poetry, cultivated a wide interest in English literature, and did occasional supply preaching. During the summer of 1852 he ministered to the congregation of St Andrew’s Free Church, St John’s, Newfoundland, and he held office in 1852–53 as moderator of the Free Church presbytery in Halifax. Above all, he enjoyed teaching, his objective being “to evoke in students a taste and zeal for philosophical investigation.” - (William B. Hamilton, in Dictionary of Canadian Biography, Vol. XI). Ex-libris Gerald A. Lear (probably Gerald Aldington Lear, graduate of Dalhousie University (1889), died 1944.

Rebacked, spine repaired, new matching front flyleaf, corners and fore-edge bumped, some foxing, underlining and pencilled notes, old penned name,else very good. 500.00



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Dain : A Chomhnadh Crabhuidh, MacGREGOR, James, Rev. MacGRIOGAIR, Seumas BLAIR, D.B.
13 MacGREGOR, James, Rev. MacGRIOGAIR, Seumas BLAIR, D.B. Dain : A Chomhnadh Crabhuidh
J.D. MacDonald, Pictou, 1861, 1861 
(MacGREGOR, James, Rev.). Dain : A Chomhnadh Crabhuidh. [by] Le Seumas MacGriogair. Searmonaich an T-Soisgeil 'an America. With a memoir of the author, by the Rev'd D.B. Blair. Pictou : Printed by J.D. MacDonald, 1861. Pp (2),[iii]-viii,[3]-111[sic 112],(2). 12mo, disbound.

A volume of Gaelic poetry first published in Glasgow in 1818.

Not in TPL or Tennyson.

"Previous to this, however, he had sent to the press his Gaelic poems, by which he has had and continues still to have no small usefulness. With an intense desire for the good of his countrymen, he had always taken a deep interest in everymeasure having that object in view, and especially in what concerned their spiritual welfare. He had spent his life in toiling for the salvation, esp ecially, of those of them who had become expatriated to the Colonies, but he desired also to do something himself for those whom he had left in his native land. With this view he had several years before conceived the idea ofrendering the doctrines of the gospel into Gaelic verse, adapted to the mu sic most common among them, as has been expressed," that he might unite the best lessons with the sweetest melodies of his native land." These poems he had partly composed years before, as he says, " in part, when travelling the dreary forests of America.

"An individual informs me that going through the woods on a very dark night, he heard a kind of singing, and in a little came upon the Doctor, who was riding on horseback, and humming over portions of his poems as he composed them. As he had obtained a little more leisure to study, he had carefully revised them. From the MSS. in our possession it appears that some of them were copied several times. As early as the year 1814 we find him submitting some of them to competent Gaelic scholars. His design as well as the execution of it, having met their approval, he accordingly put the work to press under the title, "Dain a chomhnadh crab huidh," about the year 181S.

The copyright of this little work was given to the Glasgow Tract Society, so long as they should be diligent in circulating it. The following list of the titles of the several poems will give the English reader an idea of the volume:

1. The sum of the law.

2. The ten commandments.

3. Praise of the law.

4. The covenant of works.

5. The covenant of grace.
6. Sin — in two parts.

7. On the evil heart.

8. The gospel.

"Glad tidings of great joy which shall be to all people."

"He will save his people from their sins."

9. Faith. " Believe in the Lord Jesus Christ, and thou shalt be saved."

"Whatsoever is not of faith is sin."

10. Unbelief. "He that believeth not is condemned already, because he hath not believed in the name of the only begotten Son of God." "Because I tell you the truth, ye believe me not."

11. The complaint. "Who shall deliver me from this body of death?"

12. Christ's righteousness. "That I mny be found in him, not having mine own righteousness which is of the law, but the righteousness which is of God by faith.

13. The work of the Spirit." "Poems to promote Religion." "He saved us by the washing; of regeneration, and the renewing of the Holy Ghost." " Your heavenly Father shall give his Spirit to them that ask him,"

14. Grace commended. "My grace shall be sutfieient for thee."

15. The graces commended. " The fruit of the Spirit is love, joy, peace,long suffering, gentleness, goodness, faith, meekness, temperance."

16. Gospel questions, or, Christ all in all; from the English of Ralph Erskine.

17. The love of God — in three parts. " God is love."
18. Death. " I know that thou wilt bring me to death."

19. The resurrection. " The hour cometh,and now is, when they that are in their graves shall hear the voice of the Son of man, and they that hear shall live."

20. The judgment. " We must all appear before the judgment-seat of Christ, to give an account of the deeds done in the body, whether they be good or whether they be evil."

21. Heaven.

22. Hell.

23. Spread of the Bible and the gospel."
- from Memoir of the Rev. James MacGregor, D.D., by Rev. George Patterson, 1869, pp 448-450.

Some foxing and brown stains, some leaves loose and edges chipped, else a good copy of an early Pictou imprint. Scarce. 400.00


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