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1 Acadia University - Cookery) Eating to Excel : The Acadia Students' Survival Cookbook Volumn [sic] 2
1997, 
(Acadia University - Cookery). Eating to Excel : The Acadia Students' Survival Cookbook Volumn [sic] 2. N.pl.: n.pub., (1997). Pp 109. 8vo, red comb-bound card covers. Name, else vg-fine. 6.50

Price: 6.50 CDN
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Agricultural Review : A Journal Devoted to the Interests of the Farmers andGrowers of Canada. Volume 6, Number 1, 1902, Agricultural Review
2 Agricultural Review Agricultural Review : A Journal Devoted to the Interests of the Farmers andGrowers of Canada. Volume 6, Number 1, 1902
Provincial Chemical Fertilizer Company, Limited, Saint John, N.B., 1902, 1902 
(Agricultural Review). The Agricultural Review : A Journal Devoted to the Interests of the Farmers and Growers of Canada. Volume VI, Number 1, 1902. Saint John, New Brunswick : Edited and Issued by the Provincial Chemical Fertilizer Company, Limited, 1902. Pp [1]-18. Illustrated. Double / triple Column. 4to, illustrated pale blue-green stapled wrappers.

A journal promoting the use of chemical fertilizers in agriculture, with lots of testimonials, mostly from the Maritimes.

With two pages of Rural Recipes.

Short tears to spine, lightly smudged, rubbed, corners creased, else good. 40.00



Price: 40.00 CDN
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3 AITKEN, Julia and Anita STEWART. Ontario Harvest Cookbook : An Exploratino of Feasts and Flavours. Signed.
Macmillan of Canada, Toronto, 1996, ISBN:0771573790 
AITKEN, Julia and Anita STEWART. The Ontario Harvest Cookbook : An Exploratino of Feasts and Flavours. Toronto: Macmillan of Canada, (1996). First Paperback Printing. Pp. (8),[ix]-x,[1]-261,(1). Double column. Large 8vo, illustrated green card covers. "'The Ontario Harvest Cookbook' explores the back roads and farmers' markets of Ontario to bring you more than 150 recipes that celebrate the province's fabulous food. Along with delicious recipes for everything from soup to preserves, there's a wealth of information on food festivals, markets, innovative growers, museums, wild-food forays and much, much more!" - from the rear cover. Very good. Signed and inscribed by Stewart to Nova Scotia culinary author Marie Nightingale on the title page. 20.00

Price: 20.00 CDN
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4 Alaska Crippled Children's Association) Out of Alaska's Kitchens. Third Printing
Ketchikan Alaska Chronicle, 1951, 
(Alaska Crippled Children's Association). Out of Alaska's Kitchens. By Members of Alaska Crippled Children's Association, Terrtorial Headquarters, Anchorage, Alaska. Third Printing. Printed by The Ketchikan Alaska Chronicle, 1951. Pp (6),5-241,(3),+ 12 colour plates. 8vo, blue comb-bound, illustrated yellow card covers, lettered in blue. Tourville, Alaska, A bibliography 58. Contents : Appetizers and Beverages; Breads (Yeast, Rolls, Sweet Breads,Hot Breads, Pancakes, and Waffles); Cakes, Frostings and Icings; Candies; Cookies; Desserts (Hot, Cold and Frozen); Fish and Sea Foods (See also One Dish Meals); Game; Meats; One Dish Meals; Pastry; Pountry and Dressings; Preserves and Relishes; Salads and Salad Dressings; Sauces; Vegetables. Illustrated with 12 colour plates of Alaska scenes : A Food Cache; A Totem Pole at Ketchikan; Mt. McKinley; Copper River Country; Matanuska Farm Scene; City of Juneau; Dog Team of Mrs. Rees; City of Kodiak; Alaskan Strawberries; City of Cordova; Fireweed; Sunset on Cook Inlet. A few tears at gutters, else very good. 40.00

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5 ALLEN, E. A. Prehistoric World : or, Vanished Races
Central Publishing House, Cincinnati, 1885, 
ALLEN, E. A. The Prehistoric World : or, Vanished Races. Cincinnati : Central Publishing House, 1885. Pp (6),[3]-820,(4) + frontispiece, engraved title page, and 22 other full-page engravings. Also, 327 text illustrations. Thick 8vo, maroon half leather, maroon cloth boards, gilt lettering to front board and spine, marbled endpapers, all edges marbled. Copyright by Ferguson, Alllen, and Rader, 1885. Emory Adams Allen (1853–1933). Helped by C.C. Abbott, M.D., Prof. Charles Rau, Prof. F.W. Putnam, Alexander Winchell, LL. D., A.F. Bandelier, Cyrus Thomas, and G.F.Wright. Contents : Chapter 1. Introduction. Difficulties of the subject—Lesson to be learned—The pursuit of knowledge—Recent advances—Prehistoric past of the Old World—Of the New—Of Mexico and the South—The Isles of the Pacific—Similar nature of the relics—The wonders of the present age—History of popular opinion on this subject—The teachings of the Bible—Nature of the evidence of man's antiquity—The steps leading up to this belief—Geology—Astronomy—Unfolding of life—Nature of our inquiry. Chapter 2. Early Geological Periods. Necessity of a general acquaintance with the outlines of Geology—A time in which no life was possibleon the globe—Length of this period—History of life commences at the close of this period—On the formation of rocks—The record imperfect—The three great periods in animal life on the globe—Paleozoic Age—Animal and vegetable life of this period—Ideal scenes in this period—The Mesozoic Age—Animal and vegetable life of this period—Advance noted—Abundance of reptilian life—First appearance of birds—Nature's methods of work—the Cenozoic Age Geologicaloutline—Sketch of the Eocene Age—Of the Miocene Age—What is sufficient pro of of the presence of man—Discussion on the Thenay flints—The Pliocene Age—Animal and vegetable life of this age—Was man present during this age?—Discussion of this subject—Summing up of the evidence—Conclusion. Chapter 3. Men of the River Drift. Beginning of the Glacial Age—Interglacial Age—Man living in Europe during this age—Map of Europe—Proof of former elevation of land—The animals living in Europe during this age—Conclusions drawn from these different animals—The vegetation of this period—Different climatic conditions of Europe during the Glacial Age—Proofs of the Glacial Age — Extent ofGlacial Ice—Evidence of warm Interglacial Age—The primitive state of man—E arly English civilization — Views of Horace— Primitive man destitute of metals — Order in which different materials were used by man for weapons — Evidence from the River Somme — History of Boucher De Perthes's investigations. Discussion of the subject — Antiquity of these remains — Improvement during the Paleolithic Age — Description of the flint implements — Other countries where these implements are found — What race of men were these tribes —The Canstadt race — Mr. Dawkins's views — When did they first appear in Eu rope? The authorities on this question — Conclusion. Chapter 4. Cave-Men. Other sources of information — History of cave explorations — The formation of caves — Exploration in Kent's Cavern — Evidence of two different races —The higher culture of the later race — Evidence of prolonged time — Explor ation of Robin Hood Cave — Explorations in Valley of the River Meuse — M. Dupont's conclusions — Explorations in the Valley of the Dordogne — The station at Schussenreid — Cave-men not found south of the Alps — Habitations ofthe Cave-men — Cave-men were hunters — Methods of cooking — Destitute of t he potter's art — Their weapons — Clothing — Their skill in drawing — Evidence of a government — Of a religious belief — Race of the Cave-men — Distinct from the Men of the Drift — Probable connection with the Eskimos. Chapter 5. Antiquity of the Paleolithic Age. Interest in the Antiquity of man — Connected with the Glacial Age — The subject difficult — Proofs of a GlacialAge — State of Greenland to-day — The Terminal Moraine — Appearance of the North Atlantic — Interglacial Age — Causes of the Glacial Age — Croll's Th eory — Geographical causes — The two theories not antagonistic — The date of the Glacial Age — Probable length of the Paleolithic Age — Time Since theclose of the Glacial Age — Summary of results. Chapter 6. The Neolithic Ag e in Europe. Close of the first cycle — Neolithic culture connected with the present — No links between the two ages — Long lapse of time between the two ages — Swiss lake villages — This form of villages widely scattered — Irish cranogs — Fortified villages — Implements and weapons of Neolithic times — Possessed of pottery — Neolithic agriculture — Possessed of domestic animals — Danish shell-heaps — Importance of flint — The art of navigation —Neolithic clothing — Their mode of burial — The question of race — Possibl e remnants — Connection with the Turanian race — Arrival of the Celts. Chapter 7. The Bronze Age in Europe. Races of Men, like Individuals — Gradual change of Neolithic Age to that of Bronze — The Aryan family — First Aryans Neolithic — Origin of Bronze — How Great discoveries are made — Gold the first metal — Copper abundant — No Copper Age — The discovery of Tin — Explanation of an Alloy — Bronze, wherever found, the same composition — What is meant by the Bronze Age — Knowledge in other directions — Gradual Growth ofCulture — Three Centers of Bronze production — Habitations during the Bron ze Age — The Bronze Ax — Implements of Bronze — Personal ornaments — Ornaments not always made of Bronze — Advance in Arts of living — Advance in Agriculture — Warlike Weapons — How they worked Bronze — Advance in Government — Trade in the Bronze Age — Religion of the Bronze Age — Symbolical figures— Temples of the Bronze Age — Stonehenge. Chapter 8. The Iron Age in Europ e. Bronze not the best metal — Difficulties attending the discovery of Iron— Probable steps in this discovery — Where this discovery was first made — Known in Ancient Egypt — How this knowledge would spread — Iron would not drive out Bronze — The primitive Iron-worker — The advance in government — Pottery and ornaments of the Iron Age — Weapons of early Iron Age — The battle-field of Tilfenau — Trade of early Iron Age — Invention of Money — Invention of Alphabetic Writing — Invasion of the Germanic Tribes — The cause of the Dark Ages — Connection of these three ages — Necessity of believing in an Extended Past — Attempts to determine the same — Tiniere Delta — Lake Bienne — British Fen-lands — Maximum and Minimum Data — Mr. Geikie's conclusions — The Isolation of the paleolithic Age. Chapter 9. Early Man in America. Conflicting accounts of the American Aborigines — Recent discoveries — Climate of California in Tertiary Times — Geological changes near its close— Description of Table Mountain — Results of the discoveries there — The C alaveras skull — Other relics — Discussion of the question — Early Californians Neolithic — Explanation of this — Date of the Pliocene Age — Other discoveries bearing on the Antiquity of man — Dr. Koch's discovery — Discoveries in the Loess of Nebraska — In Greene County, Illinois — In Georgia — Difficulties in detecting a Paleolithic Age in this country — Dr. Abbott's discoveries — Paleolithic Implements of the Delaware — Age of the deposits — The race of Paleolithic man — Ancestors of the Eskimos — Comparison of Paleolithic Age in this country with that in Europe — Eskimos one of the oldest races in the World. Chapter 10. The Mound Builders. Meaning of "Mound Builders" — Location of Mound Building tribes — All Mounds not the work of men —Altar Mounds — Objects found on the Altars — Altar Mounds possibly burial Mounds — Burial Mounds — Mounds not the only Cemeteries of these tribes — Terraced Mounds — Cahokia Mound — Historical notice of a group of Mounds — The Etowal group — Signal Mounds — Effigy Mounds — How they represented different animals — Explanation of the Effigy Mounds — Effigy Mounds in other localities — Inclosures of the Scioto Valley — At Newark, Ohio — At Marietta, Ohio — Graded Ways — Fortified Inclosures — Ft. Ancient, Ohio — Inclosures of Northern Ohio — Works of unknown import — Ancient Canals in Missouri —Implements and Weapons of Stone — Their knowledge of Copper — Ancient mini ng — Ornamental pipes — Their knowledge of pottery — Of Agriculture — Government and Religion — Hard to distinguish them from the Indians. Chapter 11.The Pueblo Country. Description of the Pueblo Country — Historical outline — Description of Zuñi — Definition of a Pueblo — Old Zuñi — Inscription Ro ck — Pueblo of Jemez — Historical notice of Pecos — Description of the Moqui tribes — The Estufa — Description of the San Juan country — Aztec Springs— In the Canyon of the McElmo — The Ruins on the Rio Mancos — On Hovenweep Creek — Description of a Cliff-house — Cliff Town — Cave Houses — Ruins on the San Juan — Cave Town — The Significance of Cliff-houses — Moqui tradit ions — Ruins in Northern New Mexico — Ruins in the Chaco Cañon — Pueblo Bonito — Ruins in South-western Arizona — The Rio Verde Valley — Casa Grande —Ruins on the Gila — Culture of the Pueblo Tribes — Their Pottery — Superio rity of the Ancient pottery — Conclusion. Chapter 12. The Prehistoric Americans. Different views on this Subject — Modern System of Government — Ancient System of Government — Tribal Government universal in North America — The Indians not Wandering Nomads — Indian houses Communal in character — Indian Methods of Defense — Mandan Villages — Indians sometimes erected Mounds — Probable Government of the Mound Builders — Traditions of the Mound Builders among the Iroquois — Among the Delawares — Probable fate of the Mound Builders — The Natchez Indians possibly a remnant of the Mound Builders — Their early Traditions — Lines of resemblance between the Pueblo Tribes and the Mound Builders — The origin of the Indians — America Inhabited by the Indians from a very early time — Classification of the Indian Tribes — Antiquity of the Indian Tribes. Chapter 13. The Nahua Tribes. Early Spanish discoveries in Mexico — The Nahua tribes defined — Climate of Mexico — The Valley of Anahuac — Ruins at Tezcuco — The Hill of Tezcocingo — Ruins at Teotihuacan — Ancient Tulla — Ruins in the Province of Querataro — Casa Grandes inChihuahua — Ancient remains in Sinaloa — Fortified Hill of Quemada — The P yramid of Cholula — Fortified Hill at Xochicalco — Its probable use — Ruinsat Monte Alban — Ancient remains at Mitla — Mr. Bandelier's investigations — Traditions in regard to Mitla — Ruins along the Panuco River — Ruins in Vera Cruz — Pyramid of Papantla — Tusapan — Character of Nahua Ruins. Chapter 14. The Maya Tribes. The geographical location of the Maya tribes — Description of Copan — Statue at Copan — Altar at Copan — Ruins at Quiriga — Patinamit — Utatlan — Description of Palenque — The Palace at Palenque — The Temple of the Three Inscriptions — Temple of the Beau-relief — Temple of the Cross — Temple of the Sun — Maler's Temple of the Cross — Significance ofthe Palenque crosses — Statue at Palenque — Other ruins in Tobasco and Chi apas — Ruins in Yucatan — Uxmal — The Governor's House — The Nunnery — Roomin Nunnery — The Sculptured Façades — Temple at Uxmal — Kabah — Zayi — Lab na — Labphak — Chichen-Itza — The Nunnery — The Castillo — The Gymnasium — M. Le Plongon's researches — The tradition of the Three Brothers — Chaac-Mal — Antiquity of Chichen-Itza. Chapter 15. The Culture of the Civilized Tribes. Different views on this question — Reasons for the same — Their architecture — Different styles of houses — The communal house — The teepan — Theteocalli — State of society indicated by this architecture — The gens amon g the Mexicans — The phratry among the Mexicans — The tribe — The powers and duties of the council — The head chiefs of the tribe — The duties of the "Chief-of-Men" — The mistake of the Spaniards — The Confederacy — The idea of property among the Mexicans — The ownership of land — Their laws — Enforcement of the laws — Outline of the growth of the Mexicans in power — Theirtribute system — How collected — Their system of trade — Slight knowledge of metallurgy — Religion — Quetzalcohuatl — Huitzilopochtli — Mexican priesthood — Human sacrifice — The system of Numeration — The calendar system — The Calendar Stone — Picture-writing — Landa Alphabet — Historical outline.Chapter 16. Ancient Peru. First knowledge of Peru — Expeditions of Pizarro — Geography of Peru — But a small part of it inhabitable — The tribes of a ncient Peru — How classified — Sources of our knowledge of Peru — Garcillaso De La Vega — Origin of Peruvian civilization — The Bolson of Cuzco — Historical outline — Their culture — Divided into phratries and gentes — Government — Efforts to unite the various tribes — Their system of colonies — Theroads of the Incas — The ruins of Chimu — The arts of the Chimu people — T he manufacture of Pottery — Excavation at Ancon — Ruins in the Huatica Valley — The construction of a Huaca — The ruins at Pachacamac — The Valley of the Canete — The Chincha Islands — Tiahuanuco — Carved gateway — The Islandof Titicaca — Chulpas — Aboriginal Cuzco — Temple of the Sun — The Fortres s — General remarks. Edges lightly worn, penned name, else very good. NOTE:Some extra shipping will be needed for this hefy volume. 120.00

Price: 120.00 CDN
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6 ALLEN, Lucy G. Choice Candy Recipes. Illustrated.
Little, Brown, and Company, Boston , 1930, 
ALLEN, Lucy G. Choice Candy Recipes. Illustrated. Boston : Little, Brown, and Company, (January) 1930. First Printing. Pp [i]-ix,(1),[1]-138, frontis + 7 leaves plates. Index. 8vo, blue cloth. Contents : 1. Essential Points in Candy-making. 2. Fudges: Beaten, Opera and Genesee. 3. Fondants. 4. Caramels and Soft Butterscotch. 5. Pulled Candies. 6. Nougat and Noogatines. 7. Brittles and Hard Candies. 8. Glacé Candies. 9. Bonbons. 10. Chocolates. 11. Miscellaneous Candies. 12. Crystallization. 13. Packing the Candy Box. Wear to spine ends and corners, cloth rubbed and soiled, front inner hinge cracked, lacking frontis, first plate loose, stains to some leaves, else goodonly. As is. 35.00

Price: 35.00 CDN
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7 ALLEN-GRAY, Dorothy. Fare Exchange : A collection of traditional recipes from many countries.
Kingswood House in association with Faber and Faber Limited, 1963, 
ALLEN-GRAY, Dorothy. Fare Exchange : A collection of traditional recipes from many countries. With line illustrations by Pamela Freeman. Photography by Don Swanson. N.pl.: Kingswood House in association with Faber and Faber Limited, (1963). Pp [1]-[776], colour frontis + 7 colour plates. Index. 8vo,blue cloth, gilt lettering to spine. “When Dorothy Allen-Gray began, years ago, to assemble this huge treasury of recipes of the world, she set her h eart against compiling an 'anthology of anthologies' and resolved to consult the older members of Canada's many ethnic groups, then to try out their recipes in their homes and her own. She is an utterly dedicated cook as wellas being a writer on kitchen topics and a determined traveller. In her rov ing around Canada she has sought out the older folk, welcoming the garrulous, long-memoried matriarchs from ancient villages and communities as fervently as she has encouraged those who can recall the culinary sophisticationsof the capital cities from which they are permanently exiled. The result i s a completely practical cook-book to last any housewife for a life-time. Tiring (incredibly) of the wide range of Central European dumplings or dainties, she has only to glance at the index and turn to Caucasian or Chinese counterparts, Yugoslav 'Kledanle', Canadian blueberry pie, Mexican flat cakes, Italian sauté fennel, with hundreds upon hundreds of well-remembered flavoury, savoury national specialities ranging from hay-makers' Held-snacks to highlights of wedding banquets, are here meticulously described, and all the many chapters are introduced by conclusions drawn over the years of collecting. While paying due respect to the elbow-grease necessary in old-timesmoky-raftered kitchens, the author smiles upon its mechanical replacement s. "I shall be happy," she writes, "if this book restores to the present generation part of the lore which is theirs by birthright." - from the dj. Dorothy Allen-Gray has been interested in recipes and cooking since her childhood in New Brunswick. ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGES WILL BE REQUIRED DUE TO ITS WEIGHT. Very good in dustjacket. 50.00

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8 ANDERSON, Gary SUTTON, Ed Atlantic Salmon & The Fly Fisherman. First Trade Edition in dustjacket
Doubleday Canada Limited, Toronto, 1985, ISBN:0385232845 
ANDERSON, Gary. Atlantic Salmon & The Fly Fisherman. Sketches by Ed Sutton.(Toronto: Doubleday Canada Limited, 1985). Pp (14),[1]240,(2) + 8 p. of co lor photos. 4to, navy cloth, gilt lettering to spine. 20 chapters in 5 sections. In the section Where to Fish: Chapter 9: Rivers of Newfoundland and Labrador (pp.99-109). 10.The Varied Rivers of Nova Scotia 110-121); 11.The Mighty Miramichi (pp.122-137); also short sections on P.E.I. and other N.B. rivers in Chapter 13. Chapters 3 to 8 on technique; 14 to 16 "Fishing Experiences"; 17.Sharing the Salmon: Issues and Policies [commercial fishing, Native Indian fishery, poaching, &c]; 18.Salmon Conservation and Enhancement;19.Cooking the Catch. With a bibliography and an index. Out of print. "The Atlantic salmon has long been realized as the supreme challenge of the fly fisherman. A fish of puzzling moods and limited predictability, the Atlant ic salmon is not easily understood. This book helps unravel the mysteries of this king of fishes. It is an authoritative and personal account not onlyof the salmon and how it can be tempted to the fly, but of its preferences , personality and behaviour. It is a tale of the salmon's life and prospects; it is a record of the lore and traditions which surround salmon fishing in Canada and the United States. Individual chapters cover all the salmon producing areas of North America from the coast of Maine through to the northernmost reaches of Newfoundland, Labrador and Ungava and there are tables of proven methods on two dozen major rivers. Gary Anderson shares his intimate knowledge of the salmon and its rivers only after many years of detailed observation and research. There are over a hundred photographs covering ascore of rivers as well as line drawings, sketches and maps by wildlite ar tist Ed Sutton. This book is of interest to any fisherman who has dreamed of one day fishing the mighty salmon. It will teach the novice how to begin and for the most devout expert it will provide new insights. The book is written with a depth of understanding and appreciation of nature which inextricably links the angler with the salmon and the vaiues of the past with thepromise of the future." (from the dj). Full Contents : Foreword. Preface. Introduction : 1. The Salmon Rivers ot North America. 2. The Life Cycle : Early Life in the River; Migration to Sea; Grilse, Salmon and Large Salmon; Return to the River; Spawning; Kelts; Survival. Technique : 3. Knowing the Water : Where the Salmon lie; Knowing the Water. 4. Fishing the Wet Fly : Traditional Presentation; Angle of Cast and Mending the Line; The Speed of aWet Fly; Positioning the Fly; Raising the Fish; Striking. 5. Fishing the D ry Fly : Traditional Presentation; Hooking the Hsh; Refinements in Fly Presentation. 6. What fly? : Wet Flies; Dry Flies. 7. Difficult Water Conditions : High Water; Low Water. 8. The Fight : Playing the Salmon; Landing; Releasing; Storing the Fish. Where to Fish : 9. Rivers of Newfoundland and Labrador. 10. The Varied Rivers of Nova Scotia. 11. The Mighty Miramichi : History; The River and its Fish; The Fishing; Branches of the River; Conclusion. 12. The Aristocratic Rivers of Gaspesie. 13. The Other Salmon Rivers of North America : United States of America; New Brunswick; Prince Edward Island; Quehec North Shore; Ungava. Fishing Experiences : 14. First Fish of the Year. 15. Wilderness Canoeing for Atlantic Salmon. 16. Fishing in the GrandOld Style. Conclusion : 17. Sharing the Salmon: Issues and Policies : The Commercial Fishery; The Native Indian Fishery; Poaching; Sharing the Water;Angling Harvest. 18. Salmon Conservation and Enhancement : Pollution; Rive r Management; Research; River Development and Restoration; Leadership. 19. Cooking the Catch : Caring for the Catch; Recipies; Serving a Whole Salmon.20. The Odds of Success. Retrospect. Bibliography. Appendices. Index. Very good in dustjacket. 30.00

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Iron : Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Present. First Edition in dustjacket, ARTHUR, Eric and Thomas RITCHIE
9 ARTHUR, Eric and Thomas RITCHIE Iron : Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Present. First Edition in dustjacket
University of Toronto Press, Toronto, 1982, ISBN:0802024297 
ARTHUR, Eric and Thomas RITCHIE. Iron : Cast and Wrought Iron in Canada from the Seventeenth Century to the Present. Toronto : University of Toronto Press, (1982). First Edition. Pp (6),[vii]- xiv,[1]-242. Double column. Illustrated. 4to, dark grey cloth, black lettering to front and spine. "This volume is a tribute to the ironmasters - men of persistence, determination, and inventiveness, who have been little recorded or recognized; to the craftsmen whose high standards of design and fabrication allowed beauty to touchwhat could have been mundane - kettles, pots, sugar tongs, and above all, the stoves for which Canada is famous; and finally, to the worker in wrought iron whose creations reached a pinnacle in the magnificent fence enclosing the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa. With 250 black and white illustrations of everything from steamships to stoves, trains to trivets, and spits to spittoons, this book provides an introduction to iron: its preparation, forming, application, and decorative properties and uses. The focus is primarily Canadian. As Eric Arthur explains: 'To some degree, to study iron in Canada is to follow the gradual sophistication of Canadian culture. Ironworking began in Canada, as elsewhere, to a large extent to produce implements ofthe utmost utility, yet even in these the creative abilities of the ironwo rker are visible. As Canadian society developed, ironworking gradually began to fulfil more sophisticated desires. Finally, the age of industrialization was based on the ability of the iron- worker to produce rails and locomotives, ships and machines - in short all the things that made the growth ofCanada possible.' " - from the dj. Contents: 1. The technology of iron; 2. The development of the Canadian iron and steel industry; 3. The hammer and the anvil: wrought iron (and The Lozeau crosses); 4. The engineer and the ironmaster: cast and rolled iron; 5. Fences, railings, and palings, iron grilles and gratings, hinges and hardware, handrails and stairs, doors, gates, portals and other grand entrances (with photo essay of Frederick Flatman and The Parliament Buildings in Ottawa); 6. Pots and pans, trivets and tongs, cauldrons and kettles, spits and spittoons, irons and andirons, and muchelse; 7. Initiative, inventiveness, and daring in nineteenth-century archi tecture cast in iron (with a photo essay on the Hamilton Pump-House); 8. Stoves for all seasons: for heating and cooking -- ornate for the opulent, modest for the majority -- firebacks and fireplaces, mantels and other iron accoutrements; 9. Iron ships and iron horses: the pioneer developers. With notes, bibliography and index. Very good in dustjacket. 50.00

Price: 50.00 CDN
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10 ASHLEY, Jane Les Mets que vous aimez
Canada Starch Company Limited, Montreal, 1959, 
ASHLEY, Jane. Les Mets que vous aimez. (Montreal : Canada Starch Company Limited, 1959). Pp 1--20. Double Column. 8vo, illustrated yellow and white stapled wrappers, lettered in red and black. Laid in are the following : "Desserts choisis" de Jane Ashley (4 pp); "Les plaisirs du barnecue" par Jane Ashley (pp 4 pp); "Consels pour la friture" de Jane Ashley (pp 4); and "C'est un jeu d'enfant que d'empeser avec du Linit" (de Jane Ashley) (pp 4). Very good. The five items for 30.00

Price: 30.00 CDN
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11 BAILEY, Maralyn PEYTON, Mike Galley Handbook. 1st US.
David McKay, New York, 1978, ISBN:0679508333 
BAILEY, Maralyn. The Galley Handbook. Illustrated by Mike Peyton. NY: DavidMcKay, (1978). First American Edition. Pp. (2),[1]-124,(2). Illustrated. D ouble column. Oblong 8vo, spiral bound within white illustrated cloth covered boards, gilt lettering to front, blank spine. Toy 3686. A selection of easy-to-prepare-at-sea recipes, as well as galley maintenance and safety. Rubbed, else vg. 15.00

Price: 15.00 CDN
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12 BAIRD, Elizabeth. Elizabeth Baird's Favourites : 150 Classic Canadian Recipes. Signed.
James Lorimer and Company Publishers, Toronto, 1984, ISBN:0888627580 
BAIRD, Elizabeth. Elizabeth Baird's Favourites : 150 Classic Canadian Recipes. Toronto: James Lorimer & Company, Publishers, 1984. First Printing. Pp.(6),[1]-152,(2). Square 8vo, illustrated brown and red card covers with wh ite titles to front cover and black comb-bound spine. "The selection celebrates the wealth of cooking styles and traditions found in Canada. Some of the recipes come from top-rank professional chefs -- there's Serge Bruyere'sasparagus tartlets from Quebec City, and Barbara Gordon's smothered scallo ps and cucumbers from Vancouver. Others come right from the source: a recipe for eggplant fritters from an Ontario farmers' market, and a smoked whitefish pate inspired by a visit to the Bay Fish Co. in Port Dover on Lake Erie. And finally, there are treasured personal favourites from great cooks who have joined Elizabeth in the kitchen, like Janey Purvis, Katie Williams and Cynthia Coop." - from the rear cover. A couple of small inked notations,a couple of dog-eared corners, else very good. Signed and inscribed to Nov a Scotia culinary author Marie Nightingale on the title page. 20.00

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13 BAIRD, Elizabeth. Great Canadian Recipes. Apples, Peaches & Pears. First Edition, paperback.
James Lorimer and Company Publishers, Toronto, 1977, ISBN:0888621280 
BAIRD, Elizabeth. Apples, Peaches & Pears. Toronto: James Lorimer & Company, Publishers, 1977. First Printing. Pp. (4),5-96. Double column. Square 8vo, illustrated cardcovers with brown spine. In the Great Canadian Recipes series. Elizabeth Baird, OC (b. 1939, Stratford, Ontario). "This new cookbookoffers an array of recipes, from the classic to the most inventive and unu sual, for three of Canada's finest summer fruits. Elizabeth Baird's [...] new cookbook features 125 recipes for a wide range of dishes. There are cakes, pies, pancakes, puddings, salads, stuffings, preserves and pickes. Alongwith the best possible recipes for such classic dishes as apple pie, peach ice cream or spiced crabapples there are tempting new recipes -- cranberry nut apple pie, for instance, baked peaches with almond slivers, pear ice w ater, peach and red pepper relish." - from the rear cover. Covers lightly rubbed, else very good. Uncommon. 50.00

Price: 50.00 CDN
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14 BAIRD, Elizabeth. Great Canadian Recipes. Apples, Peaches & Pears. First Edition, Signed, paperback.
James Lorimer and Company Publishers, Toronto, 1977, ISBN:0888621280 
BAIRD, Elizabeth. Apples, Peaches & Pears. Toronto : James Lorimer & Company, Publishers, 1977. First Printing. Pp. (4),5-96. Double column. Square 8vo, illustrated cardcovers with brown plastic spiral binding. In the Great Canadian Recipes series. Elizabeth Baird, OC (b. 1939, Stratford, Ontario). "This new cookbook offers an array of recipes, from the classic to the mostinventive and unusual, for three of Canada's finest summer fruits. Elizabe th Baird's [...] new cookbook features 125 recipes for a wide range of dishes. There are cakes, pies, pancakes, puddings, salads, stuffings, preservesand pickes. Along with the best possible recipes for such classic dishes a s apple pie, peach ice cream or spiced crabapples there are tempting new recipes -- cranberry nut apple pie, for instance, baked peaches with almond slivers, pear ice water, peach and red pepper relish." - from the rear cover. Light shelfwear, else very good. Signed without inscription by Baird on the title page. Uncommon. 60.00

Price: 60.00 CDN
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15 BAKER, Aunt Hattie Helpful Household Hints and Recipes
Lake of the Woods Milling Company, 1938, 
BAKER, Aunt Hattie. Helpful Household Hints and Recipes. (Montreal and Winnipeg : Lake of the Woods Milling Company, ), n.d. [circa 1938]. Pp (32) including covers, unpaginated. Illustrated. 8vo, brown stapled wrappers, with image on front of Aunt Hattie Baker in foreground and, behing her, several small scenes of women performing household tasks. Driver, Culinary Landmarks: A Bibliography of Canadian Cookbooks, Q246.1. "In this little booklet I have gatheraered together and am publishing some of the best Household Hints and Recipes that you yourselves have contributed to my column in "The Family Herald and Weekly Star." It is my hope that they may be found both useful and valuable to you, my dears, and I am offering the work with the compliments of the Lake of the Woods Milling Company, the millers of the famous Five Roses Flour." (from the Foreword by Aunt Hattie Baker). Worn, torn along spine, brown stains, top half of rear cover missing, else good. As is. 15.00

Price: 15.00 CDN
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16 BALCOM, Joan Ripe 'N Ready : An Apple Cookbook. New Revised Edition.
Gaspereau Press, Kentville, 2003, 
BALCOM, Joan. Ripe 'N Ready : An Apple Cookbook. (Kentville, NS: printed offset at Gaspereau Press), 2003. New Revised Edition. Pp. (6),7-142,(2). 8vo, illustrated green and red card covers with red spiral binding, white and black lettering to front cover. Originally published in 1966. See Laugher p.19. Elizabeth Joan Balcom (b. 1936, Berwick, N.S.). "In this book Joan Balcom shares her vast knowledge of Nova Scotia and the apple industry. A mother of three -- and now a grandmother -- Joan's love of cooking is evident throughout this revised edition of 'Ripe 'n Ready' so you, too, can enjoy the comforting aromas and flavours that you may remember from your grandma's kitchen." - from the rear cover. Very good. 10.00

Price: 10.00 CDN
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17 BARBER, James Ginger Tea Makes Friends. First Edition in dustjacket
McClelland and Stewart Limited, Toronto / Montreal, 1971, ISBN:0771010079 
BARBER, James. Ginger Tea Makes Friends. Toronto / Montreal : McClelland and Stewart Limited, (1971). First Edition. Unpaginated. Pp (96). Illustrated. Oblong 8vo, illustrated pale green cloth, lettered in brown. Not seen in Spadoni & Donnelly. "Cooking is the simplest way of saying 'I Love You'. Ifyou can accept this fact both your love-life and your cooking will improve immeasurably. This is a book for people who cook with love and enjoyment, for people who want to leave drudgery out of the kitchen. It tells you in cartoons and words how to prepare food (maximum time for most things thirty minutes), how to eat it, and even what to do while you're waiting for it tocook. Anybody can be a good cook. 'All this idiocy that makes good food th e specialty of gourmet clubs', says the author, 'is just another aspect of snobbery. Nice dishes and tablecloths are great but they are not essential.What is essential is a loose and happy approach to the stove'. You may nev er be called a gourmet if you follow this book, but you will get to be called a hell of a good cook." (from the dj). Gift inscription, else very good in rubbed, unclipped dustjacket. 15.0

Price: 15.00 CDN
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18 BARRY, Alice Lynn. Home Kitchen.
McLoughlin Brothers, Springfield, Mass., 1932, 
BARRY, Alice Lynn. The Home Kitchen. Springfield, Mass.: McLoughlin Brothers, Incorporated, (1932). Pp (4),9-124. 8vo, green paper covered boards. Contents : 1. Soups. 2. Meats and Fish. 3. Variety in Vegetables. 4. Milk, Eggs, Cheese. 5. Successful Desserts. 6. Fruit in Your Menu? 7. Hot Weather Suggestions. 8. “Pepping” Up Your Meals. 9. Kitchen Wisdom. 10. “Odds and Ends.” Binding shaky, covers sunned, faded and waterstained, a poor copy. Uncommon. As is. 20.00

Price: 20.00 CDN
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19 BEATY-POWNALL, S. Queen Cookery Books. No. 10. Vegetables. Second Edition
Horace Cox, London, 1913, 
BEATY-POWNALL, S. (collected and described by). The "Queen" Cookery Books. No. 10. Vegetables. Second Edition. London : Horace Cox, "Queen" Office, 1913. Pp (8),[1]-155,(1). Illustrated. Index. Small 8vo, tan cloth, lettered in blue and red. Some edge wear, rubbed, smudged, else very good. 30.00

Price: 30.00 CDN
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20 BEATY-POWNALL, S. Queen Cookery Books. No. 2. Ices. Third Edition
Horace Cox, London, 1911, 
BEATY-POWNALL, S. (collected and described by). The "Queen" Cookery Books. No. 2. Ices. Third Edition. London : Horace Cox, "Queen" Office, 1911. Pp (8),[1]-156. Illustrated. Index. Small 8vo, tan cloth, lettered in blue and red. Contents : 1. Origin and Kind. 2. Plain Ices, Cream and Water. 3. Sorbets and Graniti. 4. Moulde 1 and Fancy Ices. 5. Iced Puddings, &c. 6. Muscovites. 7. Souffles and Mousses. 8. Parfaits and Spongadas. 9. Charlottes and Gateaux Glacés. 10. Savoury Ices. 11. Iced Drinks. 12. Odds and Ends. Some edge wear, smudged, bowed, else very good. 30.00

Price: 30.00 CDN
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