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1 Africa) Pictorial Africa : Its Heroes, Missionaries, and Martyrs : Stirring Narratives of their Perils, Adventures, and Achievements : Together with a Full and Descriptive Account of the Peoples, Deserts, Forests, Rivers, Lakes and Mountains of the "Dark Continen
James Sangster and Co., London, 1890, 
(Africa). Pictorial Africa : Its Heroes, Missionaries, and Martyrs : Stirring Narratives of their Perils, Adventures, and Achievements : Together witha Full and Descriptive Account of the Peoples, Deserts, Forests, Rivers, L akes and Mountains of the "Dark Continent." London : James Sangster and Co., n.d. [1890?]. Pp (6),[5]-396, frontispiece. Numerous wood engravings in text (some full-page). Large 8vo, lavender cloth, front board and spine illustrated and lettered in gilt, black and red. Contents : Introduction. 1. Adventures of James Bruce—Adventures of Mungo Park—The Niger Expedition, and its Failure. 2. Samuel Crowther, the Negro Missionary—Captain Burton's Criticisms—Speke and the Victoria Nyanza—Sir Roderick Murchison-Baker and the Albert Nyanza. 3. Great Revival of Religion—Missions Resulting from it—The Remarkable Career of James Wilson-The "Duff"—Martyn, Morrison, Patteson, Heber, Williams, Smith, and Moffat. 4. David Livmgstone—His Birth—Hardships ofhis Career—Resolves to be a Missionary—Goes to Ongar—Arrives at the Cape—H istory of the Country and its Inhabitants. 5. Adventure with a Lion—Missionary Wanderings— The Bakwains — Sechele — Description of the Country—The Boers. 6. Missionary Work—Relics of Animal Worship—Removal to Chonuane—Baptismof Sechele—Ravages of the Tsetse—A Pleasant River Trip—Discovery of Lake N gami. 7. Livingstone and the Great Chief Sebituane - He Mourns his Death - Discovery of th Zambesi in Mid-Africa - The Suppression of Slavery—Return to the Cape. 8. Journey of Exploration— Kuruman—Sechele—Sekeletu—Flora and Fauna—Life amongst the Natives—Female Chieftains Interviewed—A faint Tradition of the Deluge. 9. Journeyings continued—At Shinte's Village — Native Smiths—Bechuana Vocabulary - Difficulties in the Way—The Ocean Reached—What they said in England. 10. At Loanda— Monteiro's Description of the West Coast—The Journey back—Arrival at Linyanti—Results of the Journey. 11. Moffat inwSearch of Livingstone—Affecting Meeting with a Dropsical King—Brave and H onourable Conduct of Natives—Stores for Livingstone safely deposited. 12. Off to the East Coast - The Victoria Falls - Threatening Attitude of Natives- Sekwebu's Suicide—The Gospel of Commerce. 13. The Return of Livingstone— His Reception in London, Manchester, and other Centres - Prospects of Mission Work. 14. A Great Farewell Meeting—Setting out again for Africa—A DeadlyRegion—Hippopotami Hunters—A Climb over Burning Rocks. 15. Up the Shire - Animal Life on the River—Discuvery of the Lakes Shirwa and Nyassa - The Brewing of African Beer—Funerals and Wedding Processions. 16. At t the Victoria Falls—A Royal Leper—Natives Discuss the Resurrection—Narrow Escape from aTerrible Whirlpool—Livingstone Lost by his Party—A Storm on Lake Nyassa. 1 7. The Return of the Wanderer—Publication of the "Zambesi and its Tributaries - Setting out to Africa for the Last Time. 18. Henry Stanley's Early History - The "New York Herald" Expedition—Its Equipment at Zanzibar - A Marchto the Land of the Moon. 19. Stanley describes Livingstone — They Feast to gether — Stanley's Return — Lieutenant Cameron's Travels and Adventures. 20. Death of Livingstone—Arrival of the Body at Southampton—Impressive Reception - Funeral at Westminster Abbey, 21. Emin Pasha.—The Relief Expedition—Privations and Sufferings on the March—Meeting with Emin—Stanley's Return for the Rearguard—Homeward March—Accident to Emin - Stanley's Safe Arrival atZanzibar—Telegram from the Queen. 22. Gordon and Emin Pasha—Gordon's Early Career—He goes to the Crimea—Chinese Gordon—In the Soudan—The Two Heroes—G ordon's Death. Cloth rubbed and edgeworn, title page detaching, with two first prize for attendance bookplates dated 1891, else good. 50.00

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2 AKRIGG, G.P.V. and Helen B. AKRIGG British Columbia Chronicle, 1778-1846 : Adventures by Sea and Land. dampstained.
Discovery Press, Vancouver, BC, 1975, ISBN:0919624022 
AKRIGG, G.P.V. and Helen B. AKRIGG. British Columbia Chronicle, 1778-1846 :Adventures by Sea and Land. (Vancouver, BC): Discovery Press, 1975. Pp. [i ]-xv,(1),1-429,(3), tipped in frontispiece, + 24 p. of plates. Map endpapers. Illustrated. 8vo, blue cloth with gilt lettering to spine. A survey of the early exploration of the British Columbia coastline and interior. Minor dampstain to fore-edge of the bulk of the volume, else vg. 35.00

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3 ALBERTS, Robert C. STOBO, Robert Most Extraordinary Adventures of Major Robert Stobo.
Houghton Mifflin Company, Boston , 1965, 
ALBERTS, Robert C. The Most Extraordinary Adventures of Major Robert Stobo.Illustrated with photographs and with maps drawn by Samuel Hanks Bryant. B oston : Houghton Mifflin Company, (1965). Second Printing. Pp [i]-x,(4),[1]-421m(13)m+ 16 pp plates. Maps. 8vo, brown cloth, gilt lettering to black panel to spine. "Robert Stobo enters the pages of history on horseback, at the head of a company of provincial Virginia troops marching as reinforcements into Colonel George Washington.s encampment on the western frontier. He was involved in three famous battles of the French and Indian War. He served as an espionage agent for Washington behind French lines. Taken hostage, he was sentenced to death after a show trial that caused international controversy. He twice escaped from a Quebec prison, and twice was recaptured. He escaped a third time to lead a small band through 350 miles of enemy territory. He was hailed as a hero in Williamsburg and London. He was twice captured by pirates. He consorted on intimate terms with the great figures of his time. " - from the dj. Contents: 1. Return of a Hero. 2. The Journey Begins. 3. An Army Marches. 4. Alexandria to Wills Creek. 5. To the Great Meadows. 6. Advance and Retreat. 7. The Battle. 8. Fort Duquesne. 9. Aftermath. 10. Quebec. 11. Defeat and Discovery. 12. The Trial. 13. In Prison. 14. Preparations for Escape. 15. Flight Down the River. 16. The Battle of Chaleur Bay. 17. With the Mighty General. 18. Quebec to Crown Pint to Williamsburg. 19. The Fall of New France. 20. The English Captain. 21. The Last Chapter. Very good in lightly edgeworn, unclipped dustjacket. 28.00

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4 ALDRICH, John E. and Brian C. LENTLE, (eds.) New Kind of Ray : The Radiological Sciences in Canada - Les Sciences Radiologiques au Canada 1895-1995, in dustjacket
University of British Columbia, Vancouver, 1995, ISBN:0969955707 
ALDRICH, John E. and Brian C. LENTLE, (eds.). A New Kind of Ray : The Radiological Sciences in Canada - Les Sciences Radiologiques au Canada 1895-1995. Vancouver, Canada : University of British Columbia, (1995). "Published inVancouver, British Columbia, Canada for The Canadian Association of Radiol ogists, Suite 510, 5101 rue Buchan, Montréal, Quebec, H4P 2R9, Canada". Pp (16),xvii-xxvii,(2),2-469,(3). Illustrated. Index. Double Column. 4to, bluecloth, silver lettering to front board and spine. Roland & Bernier, Second ary Sources in the History of Canadian Medicine: A Bibliography, Volume 2, pp.118 & 141. "The story of the serendipitous discovery or x-rays is almostlegendary, but it bears retelling in this volume. Although Rontgen was a r emarkable man, he likely did not foresee just how far his discovery would lead the next century. Despite its small population, Canada has played a full part in the early uses of radiation: the discovery of alpha particles, cobalt-60 treatment for cancer, Alexander Graham Bell's experiments, and one of the very first uses of a raadiograph in helping a surgeon to operate successfully, for example. [...] With more than 60 contributors and over 100 chapters, A New Kind of Ray brings together in one volume the story of Canadian achievements over the past 100 years in the fields of radiology, radiation oncology, nuclear medicine and radiation protection." (from the dj). Contents : Part One: Origins. Part Two: The Pioneers. Part Three: Progress byProvince. Part Four: Regions and the Canadian Academic Departments of Radi ology. Part Five: People. (a) The Founders. (b) The Builders. (c) Teachers.Part Six: Organizations of those Specialty Groups Working in the Radiologi cal Sciences. Part Seven: Groups, Programs and Activities. Part Eight: Radiological Sciences and the Graphic Arts. Part Nine: Postscript. Part Ten: Annexes, References and Notes. Appendices. Chapters of local interest include: Alexander Graham Bell (by John Aldrich, pp 20-23); Radiology in Newfound land (by Patrick J. McManamon, pp 72-75); History of the Use of X-rays in Nova Scotia (by John Aldrich, pp 76-85); Memories of Early Radiology in New Brunswick (by A.S. Kirkland, pp 86-91); A New Era in Nova Scotia Radiology (by David B. Fraser, pp 193-194). ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGES WILL BE REQUIRED DUE TO ITS WEIGHT. Very good in dustjacket. 45.00

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5 ALLABY, Eric Grand Manan.
Grand Manan Museum, Grand Manan, 1984, ISBN:0969178700 
ALLABY, Eric. Grand Manan. [N. pl]: Grand Manan Museum, 1984. Pp [1]-64. Double column. Illustrated with numerous b/w and/or colour photos and drawings to text. Oblong 8vo, stapled illustrated card covers. Chapters : INTRODUCTION: Getting there, Geography; Geology; BEGINNINGS: Discovery; Roots sink... branches grow; DEVELOPMENT: Early Fisheries; Shipwrecks; Life saving; Lighthouses are established; Ferry Service; Fishing boats develop; FISHING TODAY: The versatile lobster boat; Fishing boats of Grand Manan; The Grand Manan fishermen's calendar; Fundy Tides; Lobster fishing; Weir building; Weirfishing; The purse seine; The purse seine fleet; Hand line fishing; Fish d ragging; Scallop dragging; SOCIETY: The Island Church; North Head; Dark Harbor, Dulseland; Castalia, fountain of youth; Woodwards Cove; Smoked Herring; Grand Harbor; Grand Manan Museum; White Head; Seal Cove; The southern end. THE NATURAL SEA: Sea life; Other fish; Whales; Machias Seal Island. EPILOGUE. Owner's name, else very good. Due to its small size, shipping costs should be cheaper than quoted. 15.00

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6 ALLEN, E. A. Prehistoric World : or, Vanished Races
Central Publishing House, Cincinnati, 1885, 
ALLEN, E. A. The Prehistoric World : or, Vanished Races. Cincinnati : Central Publishing House, 1885. Pp (6),[3]-820,(4) + frontispiece, engraved title page, and 22 other full-page engravings. Also, 327 text illustrations. Thick 8vo, maroon half leather, maroon cloth boards, gilt lettering to front board and spine, marbled endpapers, all edges marbled. Copyright by Ferguson, Alllen, and Rader, 1885. Emory Adams Allen (1853–1933). Helped by C.C. Abbott, M.D., Prof. Charles Rau, Prof. F.W. Putnam, Alexander Winchell, LL. D., A.F. Bandelier, Cyrus Thomas, and G.F.Wright. Contents : Chapter 1. Introduction. Difficulties of the subject—Lesson to be learned—The pursuit of knowledge—Recent advances—Prehistoric past of the Old World—Of the New—Of Mexico and the South—The Isles of the Pacific—Similar nature of the relics—The wonders of the present age—History of popular opinion on this subject—The teachings of the Bible—Nature of the evidence of man's antiquity—The steps leading up to this belief—Geology—Astronomy—Unfolding of life—Nature of our inquiry. Chapter 2. Early Geological Periods. Necessity of a general acquaintance with the outlines of Geology—A time in which no life was possibleon the globe—Length of this period—History of life commences at the close of this period—On the formation of rocks—The record imperfect—The three great periods in animal life on the globe—Paleozoic Age—Animal and vegetable life of this period—Ideal scenes in this period—The Mesozoic Age—Animal and vegetable life of this period—Advance noted—Abundance of reptilian life—First appearance of birds—Nature's methods of work—the Cenozoic Age Geologicaloutline—Sketch of the Eocene Age—Of the Miocene Age—What is sufficient pro of of the presence of man—Discussion on the Thenay flints—The Pliocene Age—Animal and vegetable life of this age—Was man present during this age?—Discussion of this subject—Summing up of the evidence—Conclusion. Chapter 3. Men of the River Drift. Beginning of the Glacial Age—Interglacial Age—Man living in Europe during this age—Map of Europe—Proof of former elevation of land—The animals living in Europe during this age—Conclusions drawn from these different animals—The vegetation of this period—Different climatic conditions of Europe during the Glacial Age—Proofs of the Glacial Age — Extent ofGlacial Ice—Evidence of warm Interglacial Age—The primitive state of man—E arly English civilization — Views of Horace— Primitive man destitute of metals — Order in which different materials were used by man for weapons — Evidence from the River Somme — History of Boucher De Perthes's investigations. Discussion of the subject — Antiquity of these remains — Improvement during the Paleolithic Age — Description of the flint implements — Other countries where these implements are found — What race of men were these tribes —The Canstadt race — Mr. Dawkins's views — When did they first appear in Eu rope? The authorities on this question — Conclusion. Chapter 4. Cave-Men. Other sources of information — History of cave explorations — The formation of caves — Exploration in Kent's Cavern — Evidence of two different races —The higher culture of the later race — Evidence of prolonged time — Explor ation of Robin Hood Cave — Explorations in Valley of the River Meuse — M. Dupont's conclusions — Explorations in the Valley of the Dordogne — The station at Schussenreid — Cave-men not found south of the Alps — Habitations ofthe Cave-men — Cave-men were hunters — Methods of cooking — Destitute of t he potter's art — Their weapons — Clothing — Their skill in drawing — Evidence of a government — Of a religious belief — Race of the Cave-men — Distinct from the Men of the Drift — Probable connection with the Eskimos. Chapter 5. Antiquity of the Paleolithic Age. Interest in the Antiquity of man — Connected with the Glacial Age — The subject difficult — Proofs of a GlacialAge — State of Greenland to-day — The Terminal Moraine — Appearance of the North Atlantic — Interglacial Age — Causes of the Glacial Age — Croll's Th eory — Geographical causes — The two theories not antagonistic — The date of the Glacial Age — Probable length of the Paleolithic Age — Time Since theclose of the Glacial Age — Summary of results. Chapter 6. The Neolithic Ag e in Europe. Close of the first cycle — Neolithic culture connected with the present — No links between the two ages — Long lapse of time between the two ages — Swiss lake villages — This form of villages widely scattered — Irish cranogs — Fortified villages — Implements and weapons of Neolithic times — Possessed of pottery — Neolithic agriculture — Possessed of domestic animals — Danish shell-heaps — Importance of flint — The art of navigation —Neolithic clothing — Their mode of burial — The question of race — Possibl e remnants — Connection with the Turanian race — Arrival of the Celts. Chapter 7. The Bronze Age in Europe. Races of Men, like Individuals — Gradual change of Neolithic Age to that of Bronze — The Aryan family — First Aryans Neolithic — Origin of Bronze — How Great discoveries are made — Gold the first metal — Copper abundant — No Copper Age — The discovery of Tin — Explanation of an Alloy — Bronze, wherever found, the same composition — What is meant by the Bronze Age — Knowledge in other directions — Gradual Growth ofCulture — Three Centers of Bronze production — Habitations during the Bron ze Age — The Bronze Ax — Implements of Bronze — Personal ornaments — Ornaments not always made of Bronze — Advance in Arts of living — Advance in Agriculture — Warlike Weapons — How they worked Bronze — Advance in Government — Trade in the Bronze Age — Religion of the Bronze Age — Symbolical figures— Temples of the Bronze Age — Stonehenge. Chapter 8. The Iron Age in Europ e. Bronze not the best metal — Difficulties attending the discovery of Iron— Probable steps in this discovery — Where this discovery was first made — Known in Ancient Egypt — How this knowledge would spread — Iron would not drive out Bronze — The primitive Iron-worker — The advance in government — Pottery and ornaments of the Iron Age — Weapons of early Iron Age — The battle-field of Tilfenau — Trade of early Iron Age — Invention of Money — Invention of Alphabetic Writing — Invasion of the Germanic Tribes — The cause of the Dark Ages — Connection of these three ages — Necessity of believing in an Extended Past — Attempts to determine the same — Tiniere Delta — Lake Bienne — British Fen-lands — Maximum and Minimum Data — Mr. Geikie's conclusions — The Isolation of the paleolithic Age. Chapter 9. Early Man in America. Conflicting accounts of the American Aborigines — Recent discoveries — Climate of California in Tertiary Times — Geological changes near its close— Description of Table Mountain — Results of the discoveries there — The C alaveras skull — Other relics — Discussion of the question — Early Californians Neolithic — Explanation of this — Date of the Pliocene Age — Other discoveries bearing on the Antiquity of man — Dr. Koch's discovery — Discoveries in the Loess of Nebraska — In Greene County, Illinois — In Georgia — Difficulties in detecting a Paleolithic Age in this country — Dr. Abbott's discoveries — Paleolithic Implements of the Delaware — Age of the deposits — The race of Paleolithic man — Ancestors of the Eskimos — Comparison of Paleolithic Age in this country with that in Europe — Eskimos one of the oldest races in the World. Chapter 10. The Mound Builders. Meaning of "Mound Builders" — Location of Mound Building tribes — All Mounds not the work of men —Altar Mounds — Objects found on the Altars — Altar Mounds possibly burial Mounds — Burial Mounds — Mounds not the only Cemeteries of these tribes — Terraced Mounds — Cahokia Mound — Historical notice of a group of Mounds — The Etowal group — Signal Mounds — Effigy Mounds — How they represented different animals — Explanation of the Effigy Mounds — Effigy Mounds in other localities — Inclosures of the Scioto Valley — At Newark, Ohio — At Marietta, Ohio — Graded Ways — Fortified Inclosures — Ft. Ancient, Ohio — Inclosures of Northern Ohio — Works of unknown import — Ancient Canals in Missouri —Implements and Weapons of Stone — Their knowledge of Copper — Ancient mini ng — Ornamental pipes — Their knowledge of pottery — Of Agriculture — Government and Religion — Hard to distinguish them from the Indians. Chapter 11.The Pueblo Country. Description of the Pueblo Country — Historical outline — Description of Zuñi — Definition of a Pueblo — Old Zuñi — Inscription Ro ck — Pueblo of Jemez — Historical notice of Pecos — Description of the Moqui tribes — The Estufa — Description of the San Juan country — Aztec Springs— In the Canyon of the McElmo — The Ruins on the Rio Mancos — On Hovenweep Creek — Description of a Cliff-house — Cliff Town — Cave Houses — Ruins on the San Juan — Cave Town — The Significance of Cliff-houses — Moqui tradit ions — Ruins in Northern New Mexico — Ruins in the Chaco Cañon — Pueblo Bonito — Ruins in South-western Arizona — The Rio Verde Valley — Casa Grande —Ruins on the Gila — Culture of the Pueblo Tribes — Their Pottery — Superio rity of the Ancient pottery — Conclusion. Chapter 12. The Prehistoric Americans. Different views on this Subject — Modern System of Government — Ancient System of Government — Tribal Government universal in North America — The Indians not Wandering Nomads — Indian houses Communal in character — Indian Methods of Defense — Mandan Villages — Indians sometimes erected Mounds — Probable Government of the Mound Builders — Traditions of the Mound Builders among the Iroquois — Among the Delawares — Probable fate of the Mound Builders — The Natchez Indians possibly a remnant of the Mound Builders — Their early Traditions — Lines of resemblance between the Pueblo Tribes and the Mound Builders — The origin of the Indians — America Inhabited by the Indians from a very early time — Classification of the Indian Tribes — Antiquity of the Indian Tribes. Chapter 13. The Nahua Tribes. Early Spanish discoveries in Mexico — The Nahua tribes defined — Climate of Mexico — The Valley of Anahuac — Ruins at Tezcuco — The Hill of Tezcocingo — Ruins at Teotihuacan — Ancient Tulla — Ruins in the Province of Querataro — Casa Grandes inChihuahua — Ancient remains in Sinaloa — Fortified Hill of Quemada — The P yramid of Cholula — Fortified Hill at Xochicalco — Its probable use — Ruinsat Monte Alban — Ancient remains at Mitla — Mr. Bandelier's investigations — Traditions in regard to Mitla — Ruins along the Panuco River — Ruins in Vera Cruz — Pyramid of Papantla — Tusapan — Character of Nahua Ruins. Chapter 14. The Maya Tribes. The geographical location of the Maya tribes — Description of Copan — Statue at Copan — Altar at Copan — Ruins at Quiriga — Patinamit — Utatlan — Description of Palenque — The Palace at Palenque — The Temple of the Three Inscriptions — Temple of the Beau-relief — Temple of the Cross — Temple of the Sun — Maler's Temple of the Cross — Significance ofthe Palenque crosses — Statue at Palenque — Other ruins in Tobasco and Chi apas — Ruins in Yucatan — Uxmal — The Governor's House — The Nunnery — Roomin Nunnery — The Sculptured Façades — Temple at Uxmal — Kabah — Zayi — Lab na — Labphak — Chichen-Itza — The Nunnery — The Castillo — The Gymnasium — M. Le Plongon's researches — The tradition of the Three Brothers — Chaac-Mal — Antiquity of Chichen-Itza. Chapter 15. The Culture of the Civilized Tribes. Different views on this question — Reasons for the same — Their architecture — Different styles of houses — The communal house — The teepan — Theteocalli — State of society indicated by this architecture — The gens amon g the Mexicans — The phratry among the Mexicans — The tribe — The powers and duties of the council — The head chiefs of the tribe — The duties of the "Chief-of-Men" — The mistake of the Spaniards — The Confederacy — The idea of property among the Mexicans — The ownership of land — Their laws — Enforcement of the laws — Outline of the growth of the Mexicans in power — Theirtribute system — How collected — Their system of trade — Slight knowledge of metallurgy — Religion — Quetzalcohuatl — Huitzilopochtli — Mexican priesthood — Human sacrifice — The system of Numeration — The calendar system — The Calendar Stone — Picture-writing — Landa Alphabet — Historical outline.Chapter 16. Ancient Peru. First knowledge of Peru — Expeditions of Pizarro — Geography of Peru — But a small part of it inhabitable — The tribes of a ncient Peru — How classified — Sources of our knowledge of Peru — Garcillaso De La Vega — Origin of Peruvian civilization — The Bolson of Cuzco — Historical outline — Their culture — Divided into phratries and gentes — Government — Efforts to unite the various tribes — Their system of colonies — Theroads of the Incas — The ruins of Chimu — The arts of the Chimu people — T he manufacture of Pottery — Excavation at Ancon — Ruins in the Huatica Valley — The construction of a Huaca — The ruins at Pachacamac — The Valley of the Canete — The Chincha Islands — Tiahuanuco — Carved gateway — The Islandof Titicaca — Chulpas — Aboriginal Cuzco — Temple of the Sun — The Fortres s — General remarks. Edges lightly worn, penned name, else very good. NOTE:Some extra shipping will be needed for this hefy volume. 120.00

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Louisbourg : The Dream City of America First Edition., ALMON, Albert
7 ALMON, Albert Louisbourg : The Dream City of America First Edition.
Glace Bay, N.S, 1934, 1934 
ALMON, Albert. Louisbourg : The Dream City of America. by Albert Almon, Glace Bay, Nova Scotia. Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, 1934. First Edition. Pp (3),4-85,(3) + large folding plate. Illustrated, with forty photo reproductions, maps, and diagrams (including three of lighthouses). 8vo, printed brown card covers with black lettering to front cover and blank spine.

Tennyson 68, Tennyson, Cape Bretoniana 412, Morley pp. 85 & 106, Watters p.649, Vaison p.25.

Albert Almon (b. 1872, Glace Bay, Nova Scotia - d. 1960) a plumber and historian.

Contents:
1. Cape Breton: Its Discovery and Early History;
2. Father Daniel's Last Mass, July 4th, 1648 From The Lion and the Lillies by Charles Edwin Jakeway;
3. Louisbourg, 1720-1760;
4. The Historic Bells of Louisbourg:
Bells --
The Saint Louis Bell --
The Saint Antoine Marie Bell --
The Saint John Bell;
5. The Famous Lighthouses of Louisbourg (pp. 53-61);
6. The Duc D'Anville;
7. The Mission Chalice;
8. Poem: Louisbourg.
With appendix: The King's Hospital.

Short tear to fore-edge of first few leaves, folding plate has tape repairs to verso (but is nearly segmented due to fold splits), faint cover creasing, inking to front cover, else very good. Uncommon. 60.00



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8 ANDERSON, Lindsay, Captain JOHNSTON, W.H., preface Cruise in an Opium Clipper. New Edition
George Allen & Unwin Ltd, London, 1935, 
ANDERSON, Lindsay, Captain. A Cruise in an Opium Clipper. With a new Preface by W.H. Johnston. London : George Allen & Unwin Ltd, (1935). New Edition,Entirely Re-set. Pp (8),[9]-224. Illustrated. 8vo, grey cloth, blue letter ing to front board and spine, top edge dyed blue. Ships mentioned in the Preface include the Eamont, the America, and the Hispaniola. Contents : Preface. 1. I Take Service on Board an Opium Clipper at Shanghai; 2. A Visit to a Sailors' Boarding-House; 3. Sailors' Wrongs and Remedies — a Crimp's Tricks; 4. A Crimp's Tricks {continued); 5. I Make Acquaintance With My New Shipmates; 6. A Secret Expedition; 7. A Typhoon; 8. A Typhoon [continued); 9. The Typhoon Passes Away; 10. We Arrive at Moy and Refit; 11. The Captain Explains the Nature of the Enterprise; 12. We Reach Our Destination, but Cannot Pass the Reef; 13. Seeking for a Passage; 14. Still Seeking; 15. A Passage Discovered; 16. Bumping Over the Reef; 17. A Snug Harbour, but a JealousNeighbour; 18. We Do a Good Trade; 19. Traffic on Board; 20. Surveying the Entrance to the Harbour; 21. Surveying Operations Continued; 22. We Succes sfully Cross the Reef in a Boat; 23. Return Across the Reef; 24. More Trading; 25. The Last of Our Cargo Sold - Symptoms of a Typhoon; 26. A Typhoon; 27. Anl Armed Junk Grounds Close to Us — We Capture Her — The Dutch Schooner Swept Away; 28. We Search for the Schooner and Find Her Ashore — A Brush with Wreckers; 29. We Rescue the Crew — My Party Relieved by the Captain and a Fresh Party; 30. Miraculous Escape trom Hostile Natives — The Captain and His Men Hunted by Them; 31. Search for Missing Men — Horrible Discovery;32. An Expedition — We Capture a Mandarin; 33. Preparations for a Second E xpedition; 34. We Disembark at the Wreckers' Village; 35. The Mandarin Escapes — We Burn the Village and Return Safely; 36. A Jesuit Missionary Seeks Refuge With Us — Tells of Hostile Intentions Against Us — We Resolve to Negotiate; 37. Native Merchants Ransom the Junk — They Promise to Use Their Influence Wl'th the Chief Mandarin of the District; 38. We Proceed to the Chief Mandarin's Village, Reach Our Destination, and Land Without Opposition; 39. A Satisfactory Arrangement — We Visit the Schooner and Bury the Murdered Men; 40. The Natives Attack Us by Land and Water — They Are Easily Repulsed; 41. News of the Approach of a Squadron of Formosian War Junks; 42. The Arrival of the Squadron Announced — We Capture the Leading Junk as it Enters the Harbour; 43. The Other Three Junks Captured One by One; 44. Peace Placed on a Firm Basis; 45. We Leave — Cross the Reef Safely — Reach Amoy — I Am Sent to Hongkong with Letters for the Owners - Conclusion. Slightly cocked, spine and covers browned and smudged, name, some minor foxing and smudging internally, else good. 65.00

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9 ANDREWS, F. Emerson New Numbers : How acceptance of a duodecimal (12) base would simplify arithmetic
Faber and Faber , London , 1936, 
ANDREWS, F. Emerson. New Numbers : How acceptance of a duodecimal (12) basewould simplify arithmetic. London : Faber and Faber Limited, (1936). First Edition. Pp [1]-162,(2). Illustrated. 8vo, blue cloth, gilt lettering to s pine. Contents : 1. A discovery. 2. How counting began. 3. Practical operation of the ten system. 4. A civilized number system. 5. Inventing the new system. 6. The basic processes. 7. Decimals, percentage, interest. 8. Brief note on logarithms. 9. Curiosa. 10. A look forward. Spine and edges worn and browned, cloth rubbed, penned name, else good. Uncommon. 50.00

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10 ANTROBUS, E.S.A. (ed.) WERDMULLER, V.W. LEDNOR, M. DE JAGER, E.S.J. Witwatersrand Gold -- 100 Years : A review of the discovery and developmentof the Witwatersrand Goldfield as seen from the geological viewpoint. Firs t Standard Edition in dustjacket
Geological Society of South Africa, Johannesburg, 1986, ISBN:0620096632 
ANTROBUS, E.S.A. (ed.). Witwatersrand Gold -- 100 Years : A review of the discovery and development of the Witwatersrand Goldfield as seen from the geological viewpoint. (Johannesburg) : The Geological Society of South Africa, (1986). First Standard Edition. Pp (8),1-298,(2),+ 6 folding maps/plans. Illustrated. Maps. Double Column. 4to, bound in skivertex green (imitation leather), gilt lettering to front board and spine. Contents : I. Preamble (by E. S. A. Antrobus): Introduction; A Brief Summary; The Transvaal, 1856-1886; Early Prospecting for Gold; Eersteling—The First Mine; Mac Mac and Pilgrim's Rest; Barberton; Imperial and Metric Units; Acknowledgments. II. TheCentral Rand (by V. W. Werdmuller): The Discovery; Earlier Prospecting Act ivities; Gold Strikes Close to the Witwatersrand; Evolution of the Gold Laws; Events Following the Discovery; The Start of Actual Mining; Some Aspectsof 100 Years of Mining; Gross Production Figures; Evolution of Geological Concepts; After one Century of Gold Mining; Acknowledgements; Appendix I. Dorffel's Report on the Turf Club Borehole; Appendix II. The Rand Victoria Borehole. III. The West Rand Goldfield (by M. Lednor): Introduction; The Begiginning; The Industry Takes Off; Robinson, Rhodes, Barnato; Some Early Mines and Incidents on the West Rand; The Evolutittion of Geological Thought on the West Rand; Geology of the West Rand Goldfield; The Discovery of Western Areas, Cooke and Doornkop; The Mines—Historical Details; Summary of Production Trends for the West Rand Goldfield; Acknowledgements. IV. A. The East Rand Goldfield (by F. S. J. de Jager): Introduction; Summary History; Stratigraphy and General Geology; Contribution by Geology and Geologists; The Mines—Historical Details. B. The Soutn Rand Goldfield (by F. S. J. de Jager): Introduction; Geographical and Geological Extent of the Field; Structural Outline; Members of the Kimberley Conglomerate Formation; Mining; Exploratory Drilling; Gold Production. V. The Klerksdorp Goldfield (by K. M. Chapman, R.F. Tucker and R. J. Kidger): Introduction; The First Fifty Years; Gold Discovery; The First Ten Years of Gold; The GeoJogical Setting and the Reefs; The Anglo-Boer War; The Thirty Years after the War; The Gold Standard and Western Reefs; Strathmore and the Vaal Reef; Conclusion; Acknowledgements. VI. The West Wits Line (by C. J. Engelbrecht): Introduction; 1887-1932—The Early Days; 1932-1945 -- West Witwatersrand Areas; 1945-Present—Post World War II; Summary of Geology and Structure; The Water Problem; Gold Production; Acknowledgements. VII. The Orange Free State (Welkom) GoJdfield (by C. Greathead and J. Graadt van Roggen): Pioneer Years (1867-1932); The New Era (1932-1939); The War Years (91939-1945); Post-War Developments; Recent Years: Current Develoepments: Future Prospects; Development of Geological Understanding in the Weikom Goldfield; A Review of Operations at Western Holdings: 1947-1981; Potted Histories—Other Mines. VIII. The Evander Goldfield(by A. Leeb-Du Toit): Discovery; The Early Days; Gold Production; Generali sed Stratigraphy; Structural Geology; Looking Ahead. Waterstainins to bottom corner, covers flaring a bit, else good in edgeworn dustjacket. 180.00

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11 ARCHER, J.F. History of Staley, Radford & Co. Ltd. 1875-1975.
W. & J. Mackay Limited, Chatham , 1975, ISBN:0950400408 
ARCHER, J.F. A History of Staley, Radford & Co. Ltd. 1875-1975. (Chatham : W. & J. Mackay Limited, 1975). First Edition. Pp (4),1-374,(2),+ 2 folding plates. Illustrated. 8vo, blue cloth, gilt lettering to spine. With a Foreword by Harold Radford, Chairman and Managing Director. Cohen, The Thames, 1580-1980: A General Bibliography, p.306. “Born in the age of sail, in days when shipping could still offer adventure and discovery, Staley, Radford and Co. Ltd., continue in the shipping business, in the City of London. This history of one small Shipping Company's first century is more man just a tribute to the enterprise of the resolute men who founded it and who served it for ten decades. It is also a thread in the fabric of London's commercialhistory and the development of modern Tasmania, South Africa and other Tra ding partners of Great Britain. The book affords fascinating insights into such varied topics as the Victorian business office, with an all-male pen and ink staff, the special skills of stevedores loading wooden sailing ships, the changing patterns of cargo and of trade, and the traumatic impact of two world wars. Yet for all the inevitable differences between the Company in 1875 and in 1975, perhaps the most striking impression gained is the underlying continuity or approach, of conscientious, steadfast service, of trust and of reliability. Perhaps not surprising, in a Company that did not lose, until 1959, the services of a man who joined the firm in 1879, and where a lifetime with the Company was the normal pattern, rather man the exception. Undoubtedly a useful contribution to the commercial history of London,indeed to the history of commerce, the book is unusual in the immediacy an d vividness of the events and personalities recorded. This is not surprising, perhaps, in that although covering a century, the author joined the firmin 1921 and knew the founding generation personally. Small firms like Stal ey, Radford rarely reached the headlines, yet in their hundreds, they were the backbone of British commerce at the time when it dominated the world. In this book, Mr. Archer gives us a glimpse of the reasons for their past - and their continuing success.” - from the dj. ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGES WILL BE REQUIRED DUE TO ITS WEIGHT. Very good in unclipped dustjacket. Signed without inscription by Harold Radford. 120.00

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12 ARCHER, J.F. History of Staley, Radford & Co. Ltd. 1875-1975.
W. & J. Mackay Limited, Chatham , 1975, ISBN:0950400408 
ARCHER, J.F. A History of Staley, Radford & Co. Ltd. 1875-1975. (Chatham : W. & J. Mackay Limited, 1975). First Edition. Pp (4),1-374,(2),+ 2 folding plates. Illustrated. 8vo, blue cloth, gilt lettering to spine. With a Foreword by Harold Radford, Chairman and Managing Director. Cohen, The Thames, 1580-1980: A General Bibliography, p.306. “Born in the age of sail, in days when shipping could still offer adventure and discovery, Staley, Radford and Co. Ltd., continue in the shipping business, in the City of London. This history of one small Shipping Company's first century is more man just a tribute to the enterprise of the resolute men who founded it and who served it for ten decades. It is also a thread in the fabric of London's commercialhistory and the development of modern Tasmania, South Africa and other Tra ding partners of Great Britain. The book affords fascinating insights into such varied topics as the Victorian business office, with an all-male pen and ink staff, the special skills of stevedores loading wooden sailing ships, the changing patterns of cargo and of trade, and the traumatic impact of two world wars. Yet for all the inevitable differences between the Company in 1875 and in 1975, perhaps the most striking impression gained is the underlying continuity or approach, of conscientious, steadfast service, of trust and of reliability. Perhaps not surprising, in a Company that did not lose, until 1959, the services of a man who joined the firm in 1879, and where a lifetime with the Company was the normal pattern, rather man the exception. Undoubtedly a useful contribution to the commercial history of London,indeed to the history of commerce, the book is unusual in the immediacy an d vividness of the events and personalities recorded. This is not surprising, perhaps, in that although covering a century, the author joined the firmin 1921 and knew the founding generation personally. Small firms like Stal ey, Radford rarely reached the headlines, yet in their hundreds, they were the backbone of British commerce at the time when it dominated the world. In this book, Mr. Archer gives us a glimpse of the reasons for their past - and their continuing success.” - from the dj (not present with this copy). . ADDITIONAL SHIPPING CHARGES WILL BE REQUIRED DUE TO ITS WEIGHT. Very good. Signed without inscription by Harold Radford. 100.00

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13 Arctic Journal FORD, William L. LOTZ, Jim ALBRECHT, Earl C. Arctic: Journal of the Arctic Institute of North America. Volume 18, No. 3,September 1965
Arctic Institute of North America, Montreal , 1965, 
(Arctic). Arctic : Journal of the Arctic Institute of North America. Volume18, No. 3, September 1965. Montreal : Arctic Institute of North America, 1 965. Pp [149]-204. Illustrated. Maps. 8vo, illustrated green stapled wrappers. Includes: Wm. L. Ford and G. Hattersley-Smith's "On the oceanography ofthe Nansen Sound fiord system" (pp 158-171) - Summarizes exploration of th e fiord system of northwest Ellesmere and northeast Axel Heiberg Islands, from discovery in 1883 to 1962, and describes in detail results of oceanographic surveys in 1962. Also, Earl C. Albrecht's "Observations on Arctic and Subarctic Health" (pp 150-157); J.R. Lotz's "The Squatters of Whitehorse : A Study of the Problems of New Northern Settlements" (pp 172-188); James A.Petersen's "Ice-push ramparts in the George River basin, Labrador-Ungava" (pp 189-193); D.K. MacKay and K.C. Arnold's "Access to Meighen Island, N.W.T." (pp 193-198); plus Notes, News and Reviews. Rubbed, else very good. 20.00

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14 Arctic Journal KOENIG, S.L. DUNBAR, Moira HATTERSLEY-SMITH, Geoffrey Arctic: Journal of the Arctic Institute of North America, Volume 05, No. 2,July 1952
Arctic Institute of North America, Montreal, 1952, 
(Arctic Journal). Arctic: Journal of the Arctic Institute of North America,Volume 5, No. 2, July 1952. Montreal: Arctic Institute of North America, 1 952. Pp [65]-132. On the Ice Islands: Articles: L.S. Koenig’s "Discovery ofthe Ice Islands on U.S.A.F. Flights over the Arctic Ocean" (pp.68-75); K.R . Greenaway's "Additional Information from Flights and Air Photographs in the Canadian Arctic" (pp.75-82); Moira Dunbar’s "Historical References to Ice Islands" (pp.83-95); Geoffrey Hattersley-Smith's "Comments on the Originsof the Ice Islands" (pp.95-103). Also V.C. Wynne-Edwards’ "The Fulmars of Cape Searle" (pp.104-117); C.A. Littlewood's "Gravity Measurements on the Barnes Icecap, Baffin Island" (pp.118-124); also Reviews, News, and a letterto the editor from F.W. Peacock in Nain, Labrador. Vg tidy copy 20.00

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15 ARMSTRONG, Joe C.W. From Sea Unto Sea : Art & Discovery Maps of Canada. in dj.
1982, ISBN:0770600301 
ARMSTRONG, Joe C.W. From Sea Unto Sea : Art & Discovery Maps of Canada. (Scarborough) : Fleet/Lester & Orpen, (1982). Pp (84). Folio, black cloth. Vg in dj. 30.00

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16 ARMSTRONG, Joe C.W. From Sea Unto Sea.: Art & Discovery Maps of Canada. leather binding
Lester & Orpen, 1984, 
ARMSTRONG, Joe C.W. From Sea Unto Sea: Art & Discovery Maps of Canada. (Scarborough) : Fleet/Lester & Orpen, (1984). Pp (84). Folio, maroon leather spine, marbled boards and endpapers, a.e.g. Contents identical to 1982 edition, with spine title in Latin [A Mari Usque Ad Mare] and dated 1984 at bottom of spine. The slightest of shelfwear, else vg-fine. 100.00

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17 ARNOLD, David, (ed.) Studies in Imperialism series Imperial Medicine and Indigenous Societies. in dustjacket
Manchester University Press, Manchester and New York, 1988, ISBN:0719024951 
ARNOLD, David (ed.). Imperial Medicine and Indigenous Societies. Manchesterand New York : Manchester University Press, (1988). Pp (4),v-viii,1-231,(1 ). Index. 8vo, red cloth, gilt lettering to spine. In the Studies in Imperialism series. Contents : 1. Introduction : disease, medicine and empire (byDavid Arnold). 2. The European insane in British India, 1800-1858 : A case study in psychiatry and colonial rule (by Waltraud Ernst). 3. Smallpox and colonial medicine in nineteenth-century India (by David Arnold). 4. Medici ne and racial politics : Changing Images of the New Zealand Maori in the Nineteenth Century (by Malcolm Nicolson). 5. Sleeping Sickness Epidemics and Public Health in the Belgian Congo (by Maryinez Lyons). 6. Cholera and the Origins of the American Sanitary Order in the Philippines (by Reynaldo C. Ileto). 7. Plague and the Tensions of Empire : India, 1896-1918 (by I.J. Catanach). 8. The Influenza Pandemic in Southern Rhodesia : A crisis of comprehension (by Terence Ranger)/ 9. Bilharzia : A problem of 'native health' : 1900-1950 (by John Farley). 10. The Discovery of Colonial Malnutrition between the wars (by Michael Worboys). Personal inkstamp, else very good in dustjacket. 275.00

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18 Athapaskan Art) TEBBLE, Norman, foreword. TAYLOR, William E., Jr. IDIENS, Dale. Athapaskans : Strangers of the North : An International Travelling Exhibition from the Collection of the National Museum of Man, Canada, and the Royal Scottish Museum
National Museum of Man, 1974, 
(Athapaskan Art). The Athapaskans : Strangers of the North : An International Travelling Exhibition from the Collection of the National Museum of Man,Canada, and the Royal Scottish Museum. (Ottawa: National Museum of Man, 19 74). Pp (4),[3]208,(2). Mostly double column. Large 8vo, photo-illustrated black cardcovers, lettered in white. Helm, The Indians of the Subarctic: A Critical Bibliography 179. Contents : Foreword (by Norman Tebble). A Quiet Discovery (by William E. Taylor, Jr.). The Athapaskan Indian Collection in the Royal Scottish Museum (by Dale Idiens). The Athapaskan Ethnology Collection of the National Museum of Man (by Barrie Reynolds). The Athapaskans: Strangers of the North (by A. McFadyen Clark): Introduction; Athapaskan Historical nd Comparative Lnguistics; Northern Athapaskan Prehistory; Traditional Northern Athapaskan Lifewavs; Natural Habitat; Social Life; Annual Cycleof Activities; Life Cycle; The Supernatural, Shamanism, and Ceremonialism; Trade and Warfare; The Contact Period; The Northern Athapaskans Today. Cat alogue: Prehistory; White Contact; Traditional Lifeways; Winter Subsistence; Winter Transport; Skin Preparation; Clothing; Domestic Implements; Ceremonial Objects; Summer Subsistence; Summer Transport; The Northern Athapaskans Today. Bibliography. Maps : 1. Distribution of Athapaskan Peoples in North America; 2. Distribution of Northern Athapaskan Linguistic Groups. Spine & covers rubbed, else very good. 40.00

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19 ATKINSON, Andrew and Mark HARRIS, eds. CRUMMEY, Michael. MacLEOD, Alistair. WINTER, Kathleen. Running the Whale's Back : Stories of Faith and Doubt in Atlantic Canada. Paperback.
Goose Lane Editions, Fredericton, 2013, ISBN:9780864929136 
ATKINSON, Andrew and Mark HARRIS, eds. Running the Whale's Back : Stories of Faith and Doubt in Atlantic Canada. Edited by Andrew Atkinson and Mark Harris. [Cover artwork by David Blackwood]. (Fredericton): Goose Lane Editions, (2013). Pp. (10),11-303,(1). 8vo, illustrated dark grey card covers withwhite lettering to front cover and spine. "Two men freeze solid during a b lizzard, their bodies posed until spring. A minister discovers his wife's Internet infidelities. A former nun discusses 'Hanging up the habit' on a talk show. A ski jumper takes off... and never lands. In an unmistakable chorus of Atlantic accents, 'Running the Whale's Back' offers a host of stoiresfrom Eastern Canada's brightest literary talents. Exploring the precarious terrain of faith and doubt, these authors p[en rough-hewn, weather-beaten accounts of spirituality and religion. Consider yourself forewarned: there's grit in these stories." - from the rear cover. Includes: Andrew Atkinson's "Fish Stories or Some Likeness Thereof", Michel [sic] Crummey's "Miracles"; Sheldon Currie's "The Accident"; Joan Clark's "Salvation"; David Adams Richards's "We, Who Have Never Suffered"; Kenneth J. Harvey's "Two Crosses";Clive Doucet's "Miracle Potatoes"; Deborah Joy Corey's "Discovery"; Ann-Ma rie MacDonald's "Cave Paintings"; Michael Hennessey's "The Priest and the Pallbearer"; Alistair MacLeod's "Vision"; Lynn Coady's "Batter My Heart"; Carol Bruneau's "Doves"; Jessica Grant's "My Husband's Jump"; Samuel Thomas Martin's "Running the Whale's Back"; Michelle Butler Hallett's "The Shadow Side of Grace"; Michael Winter's "Stay the Way You Are"; D.R. MacDonald's "The Flowers of Bermuda"; Kathleen Winter's "French Doors"; and Ann Copeland's "Rupture". Very good. 12.50

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20 Atlantic Advocate PRATSON, Frederick John MULROONEY, Denys BRADDOCK, John Atlantic Advocate, Volume 62, No. 2, October 1971.
University Press of New Brunswick, Fredericton , 1971, 
(Atlantic Advocate). The Atlantic Advocate, Volume 62, No. 2, October 1971.Fredericton : University Press of New Brunswick, 1971. Pp 1-64. Illustrate d. Triple Column. 4to, illustrated stapled card covers. Includes four articles on Coastal Fishermen (pp 10-21) : 1. The Victory – ant the Cruelty (by Frederick John Pratson), 2. School Provides New Ways (by Nonie Bunting), 3.Rise of the Unions (by Denys Mulrooney), 4. The Way to Enjoy Angling at it s Best and Maddest (by Bill Greenaway). Other content : The Berlin Wall: The Tourist Trap of the Death Trap (by John Braddock, pp 22-30); The Discovery of the Red Paint People, “New Brunswickers” of 3,500 Years Ago (by David Sanger, pp 32-38); and more. Rubbed, sticker to front cover, else very good. 20.00

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