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Author Name:    AGUIRRE, Robert W. International Straits of the World, Vol.15

Title:   Panama Canal.. Volume 15 in the International Straits of the World series. First Edition

Publisher:    Martinus Nijhoff, Leiden / Boston, 2010, ISBN:9004177280 

Seller ID:   103362

AGUIRRE, Robert W. The Panama Canal. Leiden / Boston : Martinus Nijhoff Publishers, 2010. First Edition. Pp. (4),[v]-xii,(2),[1]-293,(5). Maps, tables, illustrations in text. 8vo, green paper-covered boards, light green lettering to front & spine. Volume 15 in the International Straits of the World series. "The relationship between straits and interoceanic canals has always been ambiguous. Unlike straits, interoceanic canals are neither natural nor subject to a universal legal regime like the Law of the Sea. However, straits and interoceanic canals share comparable historical experiences due to their geographic similarities. Suspending interest in a purely legal analysis, The Panama Canal lets logic yield to experience and considers the Panama Canal as an 'artificial strait'. The volume recasts the dynamic events that have changed the Panama Canal in the context of three interactive elements: environments, flows, and territoriality. Cleverly deciphering from history how changes in one element led to changes in another, The Panama Canal suggests a considerably new perspective for viewing the canal's past and future." - from rear cover. Contents : 1. Introduction. A. Straits in Comparative Perspective. B. The Three Circumstances of a Strait: Environments, Flows, and Territoriality. C. Conclusion. 2. Part One - The Environment of aStrait. A. Introduction. B. How a Strait Became an Isthmus 16 Million Year s Ago. C. How an Isthmus Became an Artificial Strait One Hundred Years Ago.D. Why an Artificial Strait Will Reach Maximum Sustainable Capacity Betwee n 2009 and 2012 Unless Enhanced. E. Conclusion. Part Two - Flows Through the Environment. 3. Interoceanic Flows in Transit Through Panama's Human-Built Environment. A. Introduction. B. The Royal Road and Cruces Trail 1540–1740. C. The Panama Railroad 1852–1869. D. The Panama Canal 1914–date. E. Conclusion. Part Three - Territoriality Over Flows Through the Environment. 4. Panamanian Territoriality in Geographic Perspective. A. Maritime-Commercialand Territorial-Administrative Societies. B. The Two Panamas Under the Vic eroyalty of Peru Until 1717. C. The Two Panamas Under the Viceroyalty of New Granada Until Panamanian Independence in 1821. D. The Two Panamas Under Great Colombia (1819–1831). E. Conclusion. 5. American Territoriality in Geographic Perspective. A. Territorial Enlargement, Political Regimes, and Interoceanic Transportation. B. Territoriality and Territorial Enlargement. C.Conclusion. 6. The Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government. A. I ntroduction. B. Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over Transportation During the ‘1st republic’ (1780s–1820s). C. Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over Transportation During the ‘1st democracy’ (1830s–1870s). D. Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over Other Buffer Zones. E. The 1888 Supreme Court Decision in California v. Central Pacific Railroad Company. F. Conclusion. 7. Interoceanic Transportation and the Two Panamas Under the '1st democracy' (1830s-1870s). A. American Territoriality Over Interoceanic Transportation During the ‘1st democracy’ (1830s–1870s). B. The Two Panamas Under the Centralized Republic of New Granada (1831–1858). C. The Two Panamas Under the Federalist Grenadine Confederation (1858–1863) and United States of Colombia (1863–1886). D. Conclusion. 8. Interoceanic Transportation and the Two Panamas Under the '2nd republic' ,(1870s-1930s) Before Panamanian Independence. A. American Territoriality OverInteroceanic Transportation. B. The Two Panamas Under the Republic ofColombia (1886–1903). C. The Two Panamas Under the Republic of Panama. D. Conclusion. 9. The Extraterritorial Expansion of the Powers of the Federal Government Over the Maritime Environment after the 1880s. A. Introduction. B. The Extraterritorial Expansion of the Powers of theFederal Government Over Islands, Straits, and Sea LanesDuring the ‘2nd republic’ (1870s–1930s). C. Conclusion. 10. The Panama Canal and The Two Panamas Under the '2nd republic' (1870s-1930s) After Panammanan Independence. A. American Extraterritoriality through the 1903Hay-Bunau-Varilla Treaty. B. The Panama Canal and Canal Zone. C. The Two Panamas During an Era of Political Opposition Among the Elite 1900s to 1930s. D. Conclusion. 11. The Panama Canal and The Two Panamas Under the '2nd democracy' (1930s-1970s). A. American Territoriality Over InteroceanicTransportation Under the ‘2nd democracy’ (1930s–1970s). B. The Two Panamas During an Era of Social Rivalry between Non-Elite and Elitefrom the 1930s to the 1960s. C. The Two Panamas Under the National Guard U ntil 1981. D. American Territoriality and the 1977 Panama Canal Treaties. E. Conclusion. 12. The Panama Canal and The Two Panamas Under the '3rd republic' (1980-?). A. American Territoriality Over InteroceanicTransportation During the ‘3rd republic’ (1980–?). B. The Two Panamas Under the Panamanian Defense Forces Until 1989. C. The Two Panamas after the Abolishment of the Panamanian Defense Forces. D. Conclusion. 13. The Future nof the Panama Canal as an Artificial Strait. A. Changes in Panama’s Environment and Competition from Other Routes. B. Panamanian Societies and American Policy Regimes.C. Conclusion. Appendix. Very good. 170.00


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