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Author Name:    D'ANVERS, Caleb AMHURST, Nicholas

Title:   Craftsman. Volume 1

Publisher:    Printed for R. Francklin,, in Russel-Street, Covent-Garden , London , 1731, 

Seller ID:   84642

D'ANVERS, Caleb [pseudonym of Nicholas Amhurst]. The Craftsman [Vol. I]. London : Printed for R. Francklin,, in Russel-Street, Covent-Garden M,DCC,XXXI [1731]. Pp (2),[i]-xxvi,[27]-279,(19), frontis. Index. 12mo, full brown calf, single-rule gilt border to both boards, gilt “I” to ribbed spine. The Craftsman was a political paper critical of Sir Robert Walpole's government. This volume contains the first 44 numbers, from Monday, December 5, 1726,to Monday, May 8, 1727. “Nicholas Amhurst (1697-1742) was an English poet and political writer. Amhurst was born at Marden, Kent. He was educated at the Merchant Taylors' School, and at St John's College, Oxford. In 1719 he was expelled from the university, ostensibly for his irregularities of conduct, but in reality (according to his own account) because of his whig principles. [...] On leaving Oxford for London he became a prominent pamphleteer on the opposition (whig) side. On the 5 December 1726 he issued the firstnumber of The Craftsman, a weekly periodical, which he conducted under the pseudonym of Caleb D'Anvers. The paper was aimed mainly towards the overth row of Sir Robert Walpole's government; there is some debate about its effects, with most historians agreeing it was doing little more than preaching to the converted. Nevertheless it reached a circulation of 10,000 copies and was one of the biggest magazines of its time with authors such as Henry Fielding, John Gay and Alexander Pope contributing to it. For this success Amhurst's editorship was not perhaps chiefly responsible. It was founded, and in the beginning financed, by Henry St John, 1st Viscount Bolingbroke andWilliam Pulteney, the latter of whom was a frequent and caustic contributo r. In 1737 an imaginary letter from Colley Cibber was inserted, in which hewas made to suggest that many plays by Shakespeare and the older dramatist s contained passages which might be regarded as seditious. He therefore desired to be appointed censor of all plays brought on the stage. This was regarded as a "suspected" libel, and a warrant was issued for the arrest of the printer. Amhurst surrendered himself instead, and suffered a short imprisonment. On the overthrow of the government in 1742 the opposition leaders did nothing for the useful editor of the Craftsman, and this neglect is saidto have hastened Amhurst's death, which took place at Twickenham.” - from wikipedia. With the bookplate of Jacob Miller Owens, Judge of Probate, Annapolis County, N.S., in 1895. Covers very worn, outer hinges cracked, nice bookplate, light foxing, else a good, solid copy. 60.00


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