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1 SMITH, J. Harry Newfoundland Holiday brown cloth, no dj
Ryerson Press, 1952, 1952 
SMITH, J. Harry. Newfoundland Holiday. Toronto : The Ryerson Press, (September, 1952). First Edition. Pp (4),v-viii,(2),1-272,(6) + 16-page central section of b&w photos. 8vo, brown cloth, dark blue lettering to spine. Map end-papers.

O'Dea 2970.

Contents (from chapter heads):

1. Mostly Introduction — With Some Comment on History and Why It Comes into a Story Such as This ;

2. We Make a Landing — Port aux Basques — Over the Barrens to Codroy Valley — Newfoundland's Loveliest and Best Agricultural Country ;

3. Bay St. George Where Fish for Sport and Trade Abound — Corner Brook, a town Pulpwood Built — Curling — Then across Newfoundland on a Narrow but Long Railway;

4. St. John's — City of Ships, Hills and Fine Churches — The Harbour behind the Hole in the Rock — Slums That Are Passing ;

5. John Cabot and the Cabot Tower - Fort Pepperrell, U.S. Army Post - Sunday in Town - State Ceremony and Government House;

6. Day of Remembrance [July 1st] - How Newfoundland Went to War - A Brave Old Ship Comes to Her End [the Eagle] - Schools and University - Libraries and Theatre - The Newfoundland Dog;

7. Founding of St. John's - Queen Elizabeth Takes a Hand - 1583-1832 - War, Oppression and Piracy - Home Merchant Control Spells Ruin - Partial Emancipation and Prosperity;

8. Legislative Doings — Fight for Responsible Government — First Parliament — Religious and Political Troubles — Victorian Propriety and Prosperity — Government by Commission — Federation with Canada;

9. Now Let's Go On to See the Country — Train Journey North along Conception Bay — Carbonear the Codfishing Town — The Irish Princess Who Became Newfoundland's First Mrs. Pike — Carbonear Island's Gallant Stand;

10. North-going Road and Round by Trinity Bay — Villages of Thankful Hearts — Harbour Grace — Ear-clipping Comes Back — Where Cod-liver Oil Comes from — Federation and Shoes;

11. Bay Roberts and Its Goats — Crossroad of Intercontinental Conversations — "We Don't Love England" — More about Pirates;

12. Brigus, Sea-salt Town if Ever One There Was — Rockwell Kent House — The Parson Turned Experimental Agriculturist [on Rev. Ezra Broughton, a retired United Church minister] — Bob Bartlett, Master Mariner — Seals and Sealing — The Wool Industry;

13. A Glance at the North Country — Pirates Again, and Ghosts - Bonaventure Bay and Notre Dame — The Grenfell Mission;

14. Southwards We Go along the Avalon Peninsula — The Land of Fairies — On to Renews — The Forgotten Fortress — Wrecks and Wreckers — Ferryland and the Calvert Settlement — Bay Bulls and Bread and Cheese ;

15. Placentia, Once Key to French Possession — The Fortress that Never Was Taken — The Lad Who Did Not Flinch — Memorial Sunday on the Hill — Argentia, U.S. Naval Post — Burin and Placentia Bay;

16. Grand Bank, a Bit of Oldtime Newfoundland — Home of Deep-sea Fishing Fleets — The Ship that Made the Northwest Passage — They Play Soccer Here — The Buffett Records;

17. Journey along the South Coast—From Belleoram to Port aux Basques and into Twenty-one Harbours — Sea-borne Pioneers in Rockbound Coves — Ramea, the Village Out at Sea — And Finally, Back to Our Starting Point and Good-bye to Newfoundland.

With index.

Very good. 25.00


Price: 25.00 CDN
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2 SMITH, J. Harry Newfoundland Holiday First Edition in dustjacket
Ryerson, 1952, 
SMITH, J. Harry. Newfoundland Holiday. Toronto : The Ryerson Press, (September, 1952). First Edition. Pp (4),v-viii,(2),1-272,(6) + 16-page central section of b&w photos. 8vo, brown cloth, dark blue lettering to spine. Map end-papers. O'Dea 2970. "When Mr. J. Harry Smith retired from the management of the Press Bureau of the C.P.R., which he originally organized, his chiefdesire was to go to Newfoundland and write a book about it. Born in Bristo l, England, a seaport that had sent many an adventurer to the island colony, it was natural that he should also feel it in his bones. What he knew casually, he now wanted to know intimately. And so he took a holiday. Wandering at his leisure, he covered much of the accessible coast, wherever there were eople, by train, motor car, boat, and on foot; and always with notebookand camera. He had time to gaze and time to talk, and the result of it all is this very readable book. There is a good deal of history mixed up with his story, for there is a lot of history about the Island itself. It helps explain the Island and the people. It is a reticent land. Life there has never been easy, and few Islanders have ever been boastful or flamboyant. Butto those who tarry and are friendly Newfoundland yields its deep friendshi p, and something of its secret. Newfoundland Holiday is a necessary book. It is a covered bridge to a deep understanding of our newest province. It reveals the rich contribution that the Island is prepared to make to our common national life. And it is a delight to read, full of enchantment, taies of heroism, the charm of old buildings, and the never-ending surprises of the folkways of the people themselves. " - from the dust jacket. Contents (from chapter heads): 1. Mostly Introduction — With Some Comment on History and Why It Comes into a Story Such as This ; 2. We Make a Landing — Port aux Basques — Over the Barrens to Codroy Valley — Newfoundland's Loveliest and Best Agricultural Country ; 3. Bay St. George Where Fish for Sport and Trade Abound — Corner Brook, a town Pulpwood Built — Curling — Then across Newfoundland on a Narrow but Long Railway; 4. St. John's — City of Ships, Hillsand Fine Churches — The Harbour behind the Hole in the Rock — Slums That A re Passing ; 5. John Cabot and the Cabot Tower - Fort Pepperrell, U.S. ArmyPost - Sunday in Town - State Ceremony and Government House; 6. Day of Rem embrance [July 1st] - How Newfoundland Went to War - A Brave Old Ship Comesto Her End [the Eagle] - Schools and University - Libraries and Theatre - The Newfoundland Dog; 7. Founding of St.John's - Queen Elizabeth Takes a Hand - 1583-1832 - War, Oppression and Piracy - Home Merchant Control Spells Ruin - Partial Emancipation and Prosperity; 8. Legislative Doings — Fight for Responsible Government — First Parliament — Religious and Political Troubles — Victorian Propriety and Prosperity — Government by Commission — Federation with Canada; 9. Now Let's Go On to See the Country — Train Journey North along Conception Bay — Carbonear the Codfishing Town — The Irish Princess Who Became Newfoundland's First Mrs. Pike — Carbonear Island's Gallant Stand; 10. North-going Road and Round by Trinity Bay — Villages of ThankfulHearts — Harbour Grace — Ear-clipping Comes Back — Where Cod-liver Oil Com es from — Federation and Shoes; 11. Bay Roberts and Its Goats — Crossroad of Intercontinental Conversations — "We Don't Love England" — More about Pirates; 12. Brigus, Sea-salt Town if Ever One There Was — Rockwell Kent House— The Parson Turned Experimental Agriculturist [on Rev. Ezra Broughton, a retired United Church minister] — Bob Bartlett, Master Mariner — Seals and Sealing — The Wool Industry; 13. A Glance at the North Country — Pirates Again, and Ghosts - Bonaventure Bay and Notre Dame — The Grenfell Mission; 14. Southwards We Go along the Avalon Peninsula — The Land of Fairies — On toRenews — The Forgotten Fortress — Wrecks and Wreckers — Ferryland and the Calvert Settlement — Bay Bulls and Bread and Cheese ; 15. Placentia, Once Key to French Possession — The Fortress that Never Was Taken — The Lad Who Did Not Flinch — Memorial Sunday on the Hill — Argentia, U.S. Naval Post — Burin and Placentia Bay; 16. Grand Bank, a Bit of Oldtime Newfoundland — Home of Deep-sea Fishing Fleets — The Ship that Made the Northwest Passage — They Play Soccer Here — The Buffett Records; 17. Journey along the South Coast—From Belleoram to Port aux Basques and into Twenty-one Harbours — Sea-borne Pioneers in Rockbound Coves — Ramea, the Village Out at Sea — And Finally, Back to Our Starting Point and Good-bye to Newfoundland. With index. Very good in spine-sunned dustjacket with a few nicks. 40.00

Price: 40.00 CDN
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3 SMITH, J. Harry Newfoundland Holiday. green cloth in dj
Ryerson Press, Toronto, 1952, 
SMITH, J. Harry. Newfoundland Holiday. Toronto : The Ryerson Press, (September, 1952). First Printing. Pp (4),v-viii,(2),1-272,(6) + 16-page central section of b&w photos. 8vo, green cloth. Map end-papers. O'Dea 2970. "Wandering at his leisure, he covered much of the accessible coast, wherever therewere eople, by train, motor car, boat, and on foot; and always with notebo ok and camera. He had time to gaze and time to talk, and the result of it all is this very readable book. There is a good deal of history mixed up with his story, for there is a lot of history about the Island itself. It helps explain the Island and the people. It is a reticent land. Life there has never been easy, and few Islanders have ever been boastful or flamboyant. But to those who tarry and are friendly Newfoundland yields its dep friendship, and something of its secret." - from the dust jacket. Vg in chipped, edgeworn dj. 25.00

Price: 25.00 CDN
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4 Nova Scotia Education) GAUDET, Alphonse B. CHIASSON, Remi J. SMITH, Harry D. Nova Scotia Bilingual Community College.
1971, 
(Nova Scotia Education). Nova Scotia Bilingual Community College. Report ofthe Community College Planning Commission. Submitted to the Government of Nova Scotia Yarmouth, March 31, 1971. By Alphonse B. Gaudet, Chairman, RemiJ. Chiasson, and Harry D. Smith. [n. pl.: n. pub., 1971]. Pp 115. [230]. I llustrated. Large 8vo, white printed card covers; text in both French and English (back to back). Some smudging to covers, ow vg. 35.00

Price: 35.00 CDN
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