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Author Name:    TURSHEN, Meredith

Title:   Political Ecology of Disease in Tanzania. in dustjacket

Publisher:    Rutgers University Press, New Brunswick, N.J., 1984, ISBN:0813510309 1984

ISBN Number:   0813510309 / 9780813510309

Seller ID:   110374

TURSHEN, Meredith. The Political Ecology of Disease in Tanzania. New Brunswick, N.J. : Rutgers University Press, (1984). Pp (6),vii-xiv,(4),1-259,(3).Frontispiece. Double-page map. Index. 8vo, pale yellow cloth, green lettering to spine.

"In this pathbrealking study, Meredeth Turshen argues that illness is not the inevitable consequence of climate or geography in the East African country of Tanzania, but grew as colonialism and captalism did. Colonial rule changed the ecology as well as the economy of the country: new political regimes imposed frontiers that did not respect African settlement, restricted the movement of transhumant groups, and forced men to leave their families in search of work. In these ways politics transformed the physical landscape. European exploration also brought new diseases, and wars ofconquest touched off epidemics. Whereas before colonial rule localized fam ines had recurred periodically, with the introduction of cash cropping, plantation farming and the migrant labor system, malnutrition became a chronic condition everywhere.

Colonial exploitation affected Tanzanian women in particular: it lowered their social position, robbed them of their function as valued food producers, eliminated their political power, and reduced them to economic dependency. These changes impaired the health and nutrition of women and their families, as well as women's ability to provide informal health care to their kin. Africans were not passive in the face of colonial oppression. They resisted imperialist economic policies and rebelled against European political authority; their struggles for better living and working conditions culminated in independence in 1981. The new government sought to meet the basic needs of the Tanzanian people, and on at least two counts it achieved a measure of success: income is now more equally distributed among households in rural and urban areas, and public services have been reformed and expanded and are now more equally accessible to all. More controversial and less successful - are its programs to reorient the system of production." (from the dj).

Spotting to top edge, name, else very good in edgeworn dustjacket. 40.00


Price = 40.00 CDN
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