John W. Doull, Bookseller, Inc.

Quick Search

Author/Illustrator
Title
Words appearing in our descriptions
Keyword(s)
 
 
 
 
   

Move your mouse over an image to pause it
Click the image to view.

Author Name:    McMILLAN, Malcolm C. MOORE, Andrew Barry). SHORTER, John Gill). WATTS, Thomas Hill).

Title:   The Disintegration of a Confederate State : Three Governors and Alabama's Wartime Home Front, 1861-1865. Andrew Barry Moore, John Gill Shorter, and Thomas Hill Watts. First Edition in dustjacket.

Publisher:    Mercer University Press, Macon, Georgia, 1986, ISBN:0865542120 

ISBN Number:   0865542120 / 9780865542129

Seller ID:   113547

McMILLAN, Malcolm C. The Disintegration of a Confederate State : Three Governors and Alabama's Wartime Home Front, 1861-1865. [Dustjacket adds: "Andrew Barry Moore, John Gill Shorter, and Thomas Hill Watts"]. (Macon, Georgia) : Mercer University Press, (1986). First Printing. Pp. (8),[vii]-ix,(1),[1]-152,(4).With a few maps & illustrations in the text. 8vo (158 x 235 mm), brown cloth with gilt lettering to spine. With map end-papers.

Malcolm Cook McMillan (b. August 22, 1910, Stockton, Alabama - d. July 1,1989).

"In this book about Confederate Alabama Malcolm C. McMillan focuses on the office of the governor, tracing chronologically the challenges faced by each of Alabama's wartime governors -- A.B. Moore, John Gill Shorter, and Thomas Hill Watts. By searching through more than a thousand letters and other documents from each of the governors, Professor McMillan is able to tell us how a Confederate governor thought and acted as he attempted to conduct the business of the state in the midst of war.

A.B. Moore, originally a Union Democrat, was fated to lead the state through the secession crisis in a manner that was never forgiven by Confederate cooperationalists or the Union -- he was the only one of Alabama's governors to be imprisoned after the war. John Gill Shorter, buoyed by his sense of God's 'inward approval', ignored political and popular pressure as he became the governor most cooperative with the Confederate war effort. Despite his divine sanction, Shorter was soundly defeated by the affable and genial 'Big Tom' Watts, who had been waiting in the shadows wanting to be governor almost from the beginning of the war -- preferring that office, in fact, to the office of attorney general of the Confederacy. As attorney general he had advocated a strong central government, but as governor he defended states' rights and so, inadvertently, obstructed the cause of winning the war." - from the dustjacket.

Preface
Introduction
1. Andrew Barry Moore
2. John Gill Shorter
3. Thomas Hill Watts
4. An Appraisal.
With bibliography and index.

Very good in fractionally sunned dustjacket. 75.00



Price = 75.00 CDN
Add to Shopping Cart


Questions, comments, or suggestions
Please write to [email protected]
Copyright©2018. All Rights Reserved.
Powered by ChrisLands.com

 

 

cookie