Beyond the River and the Bay : Some Observations on the State of the Canadian Northwest in 1811 with a View to Providing the Intending Settler with an Intimate Knowledge of That Country. First Edition in dj

By: ROSS, Eric ROBERTSON, Ian Alexander Bell

Price: $45.00

Quantity: 1 available


ROSS, Eric. Beyond the River and the Bay : Some Observations on the State of the Canadian Northwest in 1811 with a View to Providing the Intending Settler with an Intimate Knowledge of That Country. (Toronto ) : University ofToronto Press, (1970). First Printing. Pp (),[vii]-xiii,(3),[3]-190,(4) + 5 plates. Illustrated. 9 maps on five folding sheets in rear pocket. 8vo, orange cloth, black lettering to spine. Arora, The Saskatchewan Bibliography4263. "Ian Alexander Bell Robertson, the imaginary writer of this book, wa s invented by the author to describe the Canadian Northwest in 1811, in order to overcome a number of technical difficulties as well as to provide a means by which remarks of contemporary observers might be easily integrated into the text." - from the Preface. "[...] brings to life the exciting landscape of the Canadian Northwest in the early years of the nineteenth century when the fur traders from the St. Lawrence clashed with their rivals fromHudson Bay. The book is based on an imaginary long-lost manuscript by Alex ander Bell Robertson entitled 'Some Observations on the State of the Canadian Northwest in 1811.' Robertson, a friend of Lord Selkirk and Sir Walter Scott, was invented by Ross in order to integrate remarks by such contemorary observers as David Thompson, Daniel Harmon, Peter Fidler and Alexander Mackenzie into the text. Robertson was influenced by Lord Selkirk and came toshare his concern for the poor of the Scottish Highlands. Like Selkirk, he reached the conclusion that emigration would greatly assist in overcoming the economic difficulties of the Highlands. And so in 1811, when Selkirk was given his large land grant to colonize Red River, Robertson offered his support by writing a description of the whole of the Northwest as it was at that time with 'a view to providing the intending settler with an Intimate Knowledge of the country.' His manuscript was completed late in 1811, a fewmonths after the arrival of the vanguard of the Selkirk settlers at York F actory, but apparently it was set aside and lost and was not found again until 1963 when it was disscovered in an Edinburgh attic. It is now being published for the first time. The book provides a picture of the Northwest as it was immediately prior to the first white settlement, based on sources that would have been available to a writer at that time. The arrival of the first agricultural pioneers in the Northwest in 1811 marked the beginning ofthe end of the era of the Indian and the fur trade, and the first falterin g steps towards permanent settlement which later was to change the face of the West, a face which had remained for many centuries virtually unscarred by the hand of man. The Northwest of 1811, still in its natural state, is well worth knowing today, not only as a backdrop against which the to project the fur trade during its most exciting period, but as a starting point for modern studies of the geography and history of the region." - from the dj. Name, else in very good in unclipped dustjacket. 45.00

Title: Beyond the River and the Bay : Some Observations on the State of the Canadian Northwest in 1811 with a View to Providing the Intending Settler with an Intimate Knowledge of That Country. First Edition in dj

Author Name: ROSS, Eric ROBERTSON, Ian Alexander Bell

Categories: 888,

Publisher: University of Toronto Press, Toronto , 1970, ISBN:0802052231:

Seller ID: 36845

Keywords: MANITOBA SASKATCHEWAN CANADA FUR TRADE HUDSON'S BAY HBC NORTH CANADIAN ALBERTA,